Simultaneous application of slow-oscillation transcranial direct current stimulation and theta burst stimulation prolongs continuous theta burst stimulation-induced suppression of corticomotor excitability in humans

Authors

  • Sebastian H. Doeltgen,

    1. The Robinson Institute, School of Paediatrics and Reproductive Health, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia
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    • Present address: NHMRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow, DX 650-515, Obstetrics & Gynaecology-WCH School of Paediatrics & Reproductive Health, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, AUSTRALIA.

  • Suzanne M. McAllister,

    1. The Robinson Institute, School of Paediatrics and Reproductive Health, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia
    2. Discipline of Physiology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia
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  • Michael C. Ridding

    1. The Robinson Institute, School of Paediatrics and Reproductive Health, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia
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S. H. Doeltgen, *present address below.
E-mail: sebastian.doeltgen@adelaide.edu.au

Abstract

The objective of this study was to assess whether the simultaneous application of slow-oscillation transcranial direct current stimulation enhances the neuroplastic response to transcranial magnetic theta burst stimulation. Motor evoked potential amplitude was assessed at baseline and at regular intervals up to 60 min following continuous theta burst stimulation, slow-oscillation transcranial direct current stimulation, and the simultaneous application of these paradigms. In addition, the electroencephalographic power spectra of slow and fast delta, and theta frequency bands recorded over the motor cortex were analyzed prior to and up to 5 min following each intervention. There was longer-lasting motor evoked potential suppression following the simultaneous application of continuous theta burst stimulation and slow-oscillation transcranial direct current stimulation compared with when continuous theta burst stimulation was applied alone. Slow-oscillation transcranial direct current stimulation applied alone did not modulate the motor evoked potential amplitude. No significant changes in spectral power were observed following slow-oscillation transcranial direct current stimulation. Simultaneous application of continuous theta burst stimulation and slow-oscillation transcranial direct current stimulation may provide an approach to prolong the induction of neuroplastic changes in motor cortical circuits by repetitive transcranial magnetic brain stimulation.

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