Dynamics of anticipatory mechanisms during predictive context processing

Authors

  • Aurélie Bidet-Caulet,

    1. Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Present address: Inserm Unité U1028, 69675 Bron Cedex, France.

  • Pierre-Guillaume Barbe,

    1. Clinique Psychiatrique Universitaire, CHRU de Tours, Tours, France
    2. Université François Rabelais, Tours, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sylvie Roux,

    1. Université François Rabelais, Tours, France
    2. INSERM, UMR930, CHRU Bretonneau, Tours, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Humsini Viswanath,

    1. Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Catherine Barthélémy,

    1. Université François Rabelais, Tours, France
    2. INSERM, UMR930, CHRU Bretonneau, Tours, France
    3. Centre Universitaire de Pédopsychiatrie, CHRU de Tours, Tours, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Nicole Bruneau,

    1. INSERM, UMR930, CHRU Bretonneau, Tours, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Robert T. Knight,

    1. Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA
    2. Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Frédérique Bonnet-Brilhault

    1. Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA
    2. Université François Rabelais, Tours, France
    3. INSERM, UMR930, CHRU Bretonneau, Tours, France
    4. Centre Universitaire de Pédopsychiatrie, CHRU de Tours, Tours, France
    Search for more papers by this author

Aurélie Bidet-Caulet, as present address below.
E-mail: aurelie.bidet-caulet@inserm.fr

Abstract

We employed an electroencephalography paradigm manipulating predictive context to dissociate the neural dynamics of anticipatory mechanisms. Subjects either detected random targets or targets preceded by a predictive sequence of three distinct stimuli. The last stimulus in the three-stimulus sequence (decisive stimulus) did not require any motor response but 100% predicted a subsequent target event. We showed that predictive context optimises target processing via the deployment of distinct anticipatory mechanisms at different times of the predictive sequence. Prior to the occurrence of the decisive stimulus, enhanced attentional preparation was manifested by reductions in the alpha oscillatory activities over the visual cortices, resulting in facilitation of processing of the decisive stimulus. Conversely, the subsequent 100% predictable target event did not reveal the deployment of attentional preparation in the visual cortices, but elicited enhanced motor preparation mechanisms, indexed by an increased contingent negative variation and reduced mu oscillatory activities over the motor cortices before movement onset. The present results provide evidence that anticipation operates via different attentional and motor preparation mechanisms by selectively pre-activating task-dependent brain areas as the predictability gradually increases.

Ancillary