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Raclopride or high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus stops cocaine-induced motor stereotypy and restores related alterations in prefrontal basal ganglia circuits

Authors

  • Verena Aliane,

    1. INSERM U1050, Paris, France
    2. College de France, Center of Interdisciplinary Research in Biology (CIRB), Paris, France
    3. Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France
    4. Aix-Marseille University, IBDML, 13288 Marseille CX9, France
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  • Sylvie Pérez,

    1. INSERM U1050, Paris, France
    2. College de France, Center of Interdisciplinary Research in Biology (CIRB), Paris, France
    3. Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France
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  • Jean-Michel Deniau,

    1. INSERM U1050, Paris, France
    2. College de France, Center of Interdisciplinary Research in Biology (CIRB), Paris, France
    3. Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France
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  • Marie-Louise Kemel

    1. INSERM U1050, Paris, France
    2. College de France, Center of Interdisciplinary Research in Biology (CIRB), Paris, France
    3. Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France
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Dr M.-L. Kemel, 2Collège de France, as above.
E-mail: marie-lou.kemel@college-de-france.fr

Abstract

Motor stereotypy is a key symptom of various neurological or neuropsychiatric disorders. Neuroleptics or the promising treatment using deep brain stimulation stops stereotypies but the mechanisms underlying their actions are unclear. In rat, motor stereotypies are linked to an imbalance between prefrontal and sensorimotor cortico-basal ganglia circuits. Indeed, cortico-nigral transmission was reduced in the prefrontal but not sensorimotor basal ganglia circuits and dopamine and acetylcholine release was altered in the prefrontal but not sensorimotor territory of the dorsal striatum. Furthermore, cholinergic transmission in the prefrontal territory of the dorsal striatum plays a crucial role in the arrest of motor stereotypy. Here we found that, as previously observed for raclopride, high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (HFS STN) rapidly stopped cocaine-induced motor stereotypies in rat. Importantly, raclopride and HFS STN exerted a strong effect on cocaine-induced alterations in prefrontal basal ganglia circuits. Raclopride restored the cholinergic transmission in the prefrontal territory of the dorsal striatum and the cortico-nigral information transmissions in the prefrontal basal ganglia circuits. HFS STN also restored the N-methyl-d-aspartic-acid-evoked release of acetylcholine and dopamine in the prefrontal territory of the dorsal striatum. However, in contrast to raclopride, HFS STN did not restore the cortico-substantia nigra pars reticulata transmissions but exerted strong inhibitory and excitatory effects on neuronal activity in the prefrontal subdivision of the substantia nigra pars reticulata. Thus, both raclopride and HFS STN stop cocaine-induced motor stereotypy, but exert different effects on the related alterations in the prefrontal basal ganglia circuits.

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