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Species distributions, surrogacy, and important conservation regions in Canada

Authors

  • Leanna D. Warman,

    Corresponding author
    1. Biodiversity Research Centre, University of British Columbia, 6270 University Boulevard, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
      E-mail: warman@zoology.ubc.ca
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  • David M. Forsyth,

    1. Biodiversity Research Centre, University of British Columbia, 6270 University Boulevard, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
    2. Present address: Arthur Rylah Institute for Environmental Research, PO Box 137, 123 Brown Street, Heidelberg, Victoria 3084, Australia
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  • A. R. E. Sinclair,

    1. Biodiversity Research Centre, University of British Columbia, 6270 University Boulevard, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
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  • Kathryn Freemark,

    1. National Wildlife Research Centre, Canadian Wildlife Service, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0H3
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  • Harold D. Moore,

    1. GeoInsight Limited, 106 Huntley Manor Dr., Carp, Ontario, Canada K0A 1L0
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  • Thomas W. Barrett,

    1. New South Wales Department of Environment and Conservation, 6 Rutledge St. (PO Box 733), Queanbeyan, NSW 2620, Australia
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  • R. L. Pressey,

    1. New South Wales Department of Environment and Conservation, Biodiversity Research and Management, PO Box 402, Armidale, NSW 2350, Australia
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  • Denis White

    1. National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, US Environmental Protection Agency, 200 SW 35th Street, Corvallis, OR 97333, USA
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E-mail: warman@zoology.ubc.ca

Abstract

Conservation actions could be more efficient if there is congruence among taxa in the distribution of species. Patterns in the geographical distribution of five taxa were used to identify nationally important regions for conservation in Canada. Two measures of surrogacy were significantly and positively correlated among taxa, and conservation areas selected for one taxon represented other taxa significantly better than random selections. However, few large protected areas exist in the sites of highest conservation value in southern Canada; these regions are therefore a priority for future conservation regard. By focusing this effort on threatened and endangered species, which are a national priority in Canada, most other species could also benefit.

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