Get access

Culture-independent approach of the bacterial bioaerosol diversity in the standard swine confinement buildings, and assessment of the seasonal effect

Authors

  • Benjamin Nehme,

    1. Centre de recherche, Institut de recherche en cardiologie et en pneumologie, Hôpital Laval, Québec, QC, Canada.
    2. Département de biochimie et de microbiologie, Faculté des sciences et de génie, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada.
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Present address: Research Center in Infectious Diseases, CHUQ-CHUL, Room RC-709, 2705 Boulevard, Laurier, Québec, QC, Canada, G1V 4G2.

  • Valérie Létourneau,

    1. Centre de recherche, Institut de recherche en cardiologie et en pneumologie, Hôpital Laval, Québec, QC, Canada.
    2. Département de biochimie et de microbiologie, Faculté des sciences et de génie, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Robert J. Forster,

    1. Bio-Products and Bio-Processes Program, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge Research Centre, Lethbridge, AB, Canada.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Marc Veillette,

    1. Centre de recherche, Institut de recherche en cardiologie et en pneumologie, Hôpital Laval, Québec, QC, Canada.
    2. Département de biochimie et de microbiologie, Faculté des sciences et de génie, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Caroline Duchaine

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre de recherche, Institut de recherche en cardiologie et en pneumologie, Hôpital Laval, Québec, QC, Canada.
    2. Département de biochimie et de microbiologie, Faculté des sciences et de génie, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada.
      *E-mail caroline.duchaine@bcm.ulaval.ca; Tel. (+1) 418 656 8711 extension 5837; Fax (+1) 418 656 4509.
    Search for more papers by this author

*E-mail caroline.duchaine@bcm.ulaval.ca; Tel. (+1) 418 656 8711 extension 5837; Fax (+1) 418 656 4509.

Summary

The bacterial bioaerosol community of eight swine confinement buildings (SCB) was monitored during two visits in the winter, and one during the summer. To our knowledge, culture-independent approaches and molecular biology tools such as biomass quantification and biodiversity analyses have never been applied to swine building bioaerosol analyses. Total DNA of each sample was extracted and analysed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and phylogenetic analysis using primers targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Even though the total bacterial concentration was higher in winter than in summer, the total bacterial concentration for both seasons was 100 to1000 times higher than the total cultural bacteria. The concentration of bioaerosol was influenced by the temperature indoors, which was regulated with an electronic fan system driving warm air and particles outside of the SCB. Comparison of the DGGE profiles showed the same biodiversity in each SCB during both seasons. The phylogenetic analysis revealed a large number of sequences (93.8%) related to Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria, such as Clostridia, and dominated by the Clostridia cluster I (C. disporicum) and the Clostridia cluster XI (C. glycolycum). The bioaerosol diversity also contained also a low proportion of Bacteroidetes and LactobacillalesStreptococcales sequences. Analyses of the global community and phylotype diversity showed that the main source of bioaerosols could come from the pig manure slurry.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary