The Gram-positive side of plant–microbe interactions

Authors

  • Isolde Francis,

    1. Department of Plant Systems Biology, Flanders Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), and
    2. Department of Plant Biotechnology and Genetics, Ghent University, Technologiepark 927, B-9052 Gent, Belgium.
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  • Marcelle Holsters,

    1. Department of Plant Systems Biology, Flanders Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), and
    2. Department of Plant Biotechnology and Genetics, Ghent University, Technologiepark 927, B-9052 Gent, Belgium.
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  • Danny Vereecke

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Plant Systems Biology, Flanders Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), and
    2. Department of Plant Biotechnology and Genetics, Ghent University, Technologiepark 927, B-9052 Gent, Belgium.
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*E-mail daver@psb.vib-ugent.be; Tel. (+32) 9 3313911; Fax (+32) 9 3313809.

Summary

Plant growth and development are significantly influenced by the presence and activity of microorganisms. To date, the best-studied plant-interacting microbes are Gram-negative bacteria, but many representatives of both the high and low G+C Gram-positives have excellent biocontrol, plant growth-promoting and bioremediation activities. Moreover, actinorhizal symbioses largely contribute to the global biological nitrogen fixation and many Gram-positive bacteria promote other types of symbioses in tripartite interactions. Finally, several prominent and devastating phytopathogens are Gram-positive. We summarize the present knowledge of the beneficial and detrimental interactions of Gram-positive bacteria with plants to underline the importance of this particular group of bacteria.

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