Multi-host ectomycorrhizal fungi are predominant in a Guinean tropical rainforest and shared between canopy trees and seedlings

Authors

  • Abdala Gamby Diédhiou,

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratoire des Symbioses Tropicales et Méditerranéennes, UMR113 – INRA/AGRO-M/CIRAD/IRD/UM2 – TA10/J, Campus International de Baillarguet, 34398 Montpellier Cedex 5, France.
    2. Laboratoire Commun de Microbiologie, IRD/UCAD/ISRA, BP 1386 Dakar, Sénégal.
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    • Present address: Laboratoire Commun de Microbiologie, IRD/UCAD/ISRA, BP 1386 Bel-Air, Dakar, Senegal.

  • Marc-André Selosse,

    1. Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive (CNRS, UMR 5175), Equipe Interactions Biotiques, 1919 Route de Mende, 34293 Montpellier Cedex 5, France.
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  • Antoine Galiana,

    1. Laboratoire des Symbioses Tropicales et Méditerranéennes, UMR113 – INRA/AGRO-M/CIRAD/IRD/UM2 – TA10/J, Campus International de Baillarguet, 34398 Montpellier Cedex 5, France.
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  • Moussa Diabaté,

    1. Laboratoire des Symbioses Tropicales et Méditerranéennes, UMR113 – INRA/AGRO-M/CIRAD/IRD/UM2 – TA10/J, Campus International de Baillarguet, 34398 Montpellier Cedex 5, France.
    2. Institut de Recherche Agronomique de Guinée, Division des Cultures Pérennes, Programme Recherche Forestière, BP 1523, Conakry, République de Guinée.
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  • Bernard Dreyfus,

    1. Laboratoire des Symbioses Tropicales et Méditerranéennes, UMR113 – INRA/AGRO-M/CIRAD/IRD/UM2 – TA10/J, Campus International de Baillarguet, 34398 Montpellier Cedex 5, France.
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  • Amadou Moustapha Bâ,

    1. Laboratoire des Symbioses Tropicales et Méditerranéennes, UMR113 – INRA/AGRO-M/CIRAD/IRD/UM2 – TA10/J, Campus International de Baillarguet, 34398 Montpellier Cedex 5, France.
    2. Laboratoire de Biologie et Physiologie Végétales, Faculté des Sciences Exactes et Naturelles, Université des Antilles et de la Guyane, BP 592, 97159 Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe, France.
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  • Sergio Miana De Faria,

    1. Embrapa Agrobiologia km 47, antiga estrada Rio-São Paulo, Seropédica 23851-970 Brazil.
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  • Gilles Béna

    1. Laboratoire des Symbioses Tropicales et Méditerranéennes, UMR113 – INRA/AGRO-M/CIRAD/IRD/UM2 – TA10/J, Campus International de Baillarguet, 34398 Montpellier Cedex 5, France.
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Summary

The diversity of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi on adult trees and seedlings of five species, Anthonotha fragrans, Anthonotha macrophylla, Cryptosepalum tetraphyllum, Paramacrolobium coeruleum and Uapaca esculenta, was determined in a tropical rain forest of Guinea. Ectomycorrhizae were sampled within a surface area of 1600 m2, and fungal taxa were identified by sequencing the rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacer region. Thirty-nine ECM fungal taxa were determined, of which 19 multi-hosts, 9 single-hosts and 11 singletons. The multi-host fungi represented 92% (89% when including the singletons in the analysis) of the total abundance. Except for A. fragrans, the adults of the host species displayed significant differentiation for their fungal communities, but their seedlings harboured a similar fungal community. These findings suggest that there was a potential for the formation of common mycorrhizal networks in close vicinity. However, no significant difference was detected for the δ13C and δ15N values between seedlings and adults of each ECM plant, and no ECM species exhibited signatures of mixotrophy. Our results revealed (i) variation in ECM fungal diversity according to the seedling versus adult development stage of trees and (ii) low host specificity of ECM fungi, and indicated that multi-host fungi are more abundant than single-host fungi in this forest stand.

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