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Soil bacterial diversity in the Arctic is not fundamentally different from that found in other biomes

Authors

  • Haiyan Chu,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biology, Queen's University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada.
    2. State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, East Beijing Road 71, Nanjing, 210008, China.
      E-mail chuh@queensu.ca; hychu@issas.ac.cn; Tel. (+1) 613 533 6000 ext. 78059; Fax (+1) 613 533 6617.
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  • Noah Fierer,

    1. Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, UCB 216, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.
    2. Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, UCB 334, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.
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  • Christian L. Lauber,

    1. Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, UCB 216, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.
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  • J. G. Caporaso,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, UCB 215, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.
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  • Rob Knight,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, UCB 215, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.
    2. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.
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  • Paul Grogan

    1. Department of Biology, Queen's University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada.
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Corrigendum Volume 13, Issue 3, 833, Article first published online: 1 March 2011

E-mail chuh@queensu.ca; hychu@issas.ac.cn; Tel. (+1) 613 533 6000 ext. 78059; Fax (+1) 613 533 6617.

Summary

The severe environmental stresses of the Arctic may have promoted unique soil bacterial communities compared with those found in lower latitude environments. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the biogeography of soil bacterial communities in the Arctic using a high resolution bar-coded pyrosequencing technique. We also compared arctic soils with soils from a wide range of more temperate biomes to characterize variability in soil bacterial communities across the globe. We show that arctic soil bacterial community composition and diversity are structured according to local variation in soil pH rather than geographical proximity to neighboring sites, suggesting that local environmental heterogeneity is far more important than dispersal limitation in determining community-level differences. Furthermore, bacterial community composition had similar levels of variability, richness and phylogenetic diversity within arctic soils as across soils from a wide range of lower latitudes, strongly suggesting a common diversity structure within soil bacterial communities around the globe. These results contrast with the well-established latitudinal gradients in animal and plant diversity, suggesting that the controls on bacterial community distributions are fundamentally different from those observed for macro-organisms and that our biome definitions are not useful for predicting variability in soil bacterial communities across the globe.

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