Proteomic assessment of host-associated microevolution in the fungus Thielaviopsis basicola

Authors

  • J. V. F. Coumans,

    Corresponding author
    1. Molecular and Cellular Biology, School of Science and Technology, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
    2. Cotton Catchment Communities CRC, Locked Bag 1001, Narrabri, NSW, Australia
      E-mail jmoensco@une.edu.au; Tel. (+61) 2 6773 2942; Fax (+61) 2 6773 3267.
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  • J. Harvey,

    1. School of Biological Science, The University of Queensland, QLD, Australia
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  • D. Backhouse,

    1. Botany, School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
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  • A. Poljak,

    1. Bioanalytical Mass Spectrometry Facility, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    2. School of Medical Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
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  • M. J. Raftery,

    1. Bioanalytical Mass Spectrometry Facility, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
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  • D. Nehl,

    1. Cotton Catchment Communities CRC, Locked Bag 1001, Narrabri, NSW, Australia
    2. NSW Department of Industry and Investment, Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute, Menangle, NSW, Australia
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  • M. E. Katz,

    1. Molecular and Cellular Biology, School of Science and Technology, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
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  • L. Pereg

    1. Molecular and Cellular Biology, School of Science and Technology, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
    2. Cotton Catchment Communities CRC, Locked Bag 1001, Narrabri, NSW, Australia
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E-mail jmoensco@une.edu.au; Tel. (+61) 2 6773 2942; Fax (+61) 2 6773 3267.

Summary

Thielaviopsis basicola, a soil-borne pathogen with a broad host range and a cosmopolitan distribution, is emerging as a major risk to sustainable cotton production in Australia. Previous studies suggested that host specialization has occurred making T. basicola an ideal model for a comparative proteomic analysis of strains isolated from different hosts. Elucidation of the genomic diversity and investigation of the functional differences in the Australian population could provide valuable information towards disease control. In this study, isolates of T. basicola were investigated for genomic (internal transcribed spacers region), proteomic and cotton virulence level variations. Internal transcribed spacers sequence analysis revealed that isolates are grouped based on host of origin irrespective of geographical origin. At the proteome level a degree of diversity was apparent and hierarchical clustering analysis of the data also demonstrated a close correlation between the proteome and the host of origin. LC-MS/MS analysis and identification using cross-species similarity searching and de novo sequencing of host-specific differentially expressed proteins and the virulence-correlated proteome allowed successful identification of 43 spots. The majority were found to be involved in metabolism. Spots that were correlated with host and virulence differences included a hypothetical protein with a Rossman-fold NAD(P)(+)-binding protein domain, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, arginase and tetrahydroxynaphthalene reductase.

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