Pseudomonas putida growing at low temperature shows increased levels of CrcZ and CrcY sRNAs, leading to reduced Crc-dependent catabolite repression

Authors

  • Pilar Fonseca,

    1. Departamento de Biotecnología Microbiana, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología, CSIC, Campus UAM, Cantoblanco, 28049 – Madrid, Spain
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    • Present address: Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid, Spain.

  • Renata Moreno,

    1. Departamento de Biotecnología Microbiana, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología, CSIC, Campus UAM, Cantoblanco, 28049 – Madrid, Spain
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  • Fernando Rojo

    Corresponding author
    1. Departamento de Biotecnología Microbiana, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología, CSIC, Campus UAM, Cantoblanco, 28049 – Madrid, Spain
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E-mail frojo@cnb.csic.es; Tel. (+34) 91 585 45 39; Fax (+34) 91 585 45 06.

Summary

The Crc protein of Pseudomonas inhibits the expression of genes involved in the transport and assimilation of a number of non-preferred carbon sources when preferred substrates are available, thus coordinating carbon metabolism. Crc acts by binding to target mRNAs, inhibiting their translation. In Pseudomonas putida, the amount of free Crc available is controlled by two sRNAs, CrcY and CrcZ, which bind to and sequester Crc. The levels of these sRNAs vary according to metabolic conditions. Pseudomonas putida grows optimally at 30°C, but can also thrive at 10°C. The present work shows that when cells grow exponentially at 10°C, the repressive effect of Crc on many genes is significantly reduced compared with that seen at 30°C. Total Crc levels were similar at both temperatures, but those of CrcZ and CrcY were significantly higher at 10°C. Therefore, Crc-mediated repression may, at least in part, be reduced at 10°C because the fraction of Crc protein sequestered by CrcZ and CrcY is larger, reducing the amount of free Crc available to bind its targets. This may help P. putida to face cold stress. The results reported might help understanding the behaviour of this bacterium in bioremediation or rhizoremediation strategies at low temperatures.

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