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emi2860-sup-0001-si.pdf598K

Fig. S1. Protection of tomato plants from bacterial wilt disease after treatment with wild type B. subtilis cells or various biofilm mutants. Shown in each panel, tomato plants were treated with one specific B. subtilis strain and 1 week later challenged with R. solanacearum. Thirty millilitres of the B. subtilis suspension (adjusted to a cell density of 108 cells per ml) was applied as irrigation to each pot. One week after inoculation with the B. subtilis suspension, 20 ml of R. solanacearum ZJ3721 cell suspension (~107 cells per ml) was drenched into each pot. Pictures were taken 4 weeks after treatment with B. subtilis cells. Bacillus subtilis strains applied in each panel (from A to I) are as follows: (A) wild type 3610; (B) ΔabrB; (C) ΔywcC; (D) ΔsinR; (E) ΔsinI; (F) ΔtasA; (G) ΔepsA-O; (H) ΔsrfAA; (I) H2O as a blank control.

emi2860-sup-0001-si.pdf598K

Fig. S2. Biofilm colony morphology of the wild isolates CYBS-3, CYBS-7 and CYBS-16 on MSgg media. Cells were spotted on the solid MSgg plates and the plates were incubated for 72 h at 22°C before imaging. Scale bar, 0.2 cm.

emi2860-sup-0001-si.pdf598K

Fig. S3. Antagonistic abilities of the B. subtilis wild isolates against various plant pathogens in vitro. Bacillus subtilis cells were inoculated as spots on the plates on which a lawn of cells for each tested plant pathogen were applied. Halos surrounding the B. subtilis inoculums indicated that the growth of pathogenic cells was inhibited by B. subtilis cells. Scale bars, 1.5 cm.

emi2860-sup-0001-si.pdf598K

Table S1. Strains used in this study.

emi2860-sup-0001-si.pdf598K

Table S2. Primers used in this study.

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