Effect of antiobesity medications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

Authors

  • Souzana Choussein,

    1. Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
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  • Angeliki A. Makri,

    1. Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
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  • Constantinos C. Frangos,

    1. Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
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  • Eleni Th. Petridou,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
      Prof. Eleni Th. Petridou, MD, MPH, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias Street, Goudi, Athens 11527, Greece.
      E-mail:
      epetrid@med.uoa.gr
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  • Stella S. Daskalopoulou

    1. Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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Prof. Eleni Th. Petridou, MD, MPH, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias Street, Goudi, Athens 11527, Greece.
E-mail:
epetrid@med.uoa.gr

Abstract

Obesity is considered as a major health problem, as its prevalence continuously rises worldwide. One of the common health consequences of obesity is type 2 diabetes mellitus. Therefore, antiobesity management is a prerequisite in treating diabetic patients. Lifestyle modifications combined with pharmacological agents appear to be an effective approach. Sibutramine is a serotonin–noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, which acts centrally by promoting the feeling of satiety and decreasing caloric intake, thus resulting in weight loss. A potential association with cardiovascular side effects has been noted. Orlistat, a gastric and pancreatic lipase inhibitor, also achieves significant weight loss and improves glycaemic status, but it has gastrointestinal side effects. Rimonabant, the first endocannabinoid CB1 antagonist, is associated with weight reduction and it improves diabetic parameters; nevertheless, it is associated with psychiatric disorders; indeed, a recently conducted safety review led to the temporal suspension of its commercialization. The above-mentioned medications seem to be currently useful agents for treating obesity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Other medications used for diabetes management, such as exenatide, liraglutide and pramlintide, have also shown body weight reduction. Ongoing research is needed to scrutinize the precise impact of these agents in the daily clinical practice of management of obesity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

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