Evaluating the cost-effectiveness of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding versus standard medical management in obese patients with type 2 diabetes in the UK

Authors


Correspondence to: Richard F. Pollock, MA MSci, Ossian Health Economics and Communications GmbH, Bäumleingasse 20, Basel 4051, Switzerland.

E-mail: pollock@ossianconsulting.com

Abstract

Aim

To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) versus standard medical management (SMM) in obese patients with type 2 diabetes from a UK healthcare payer perspective.

Methods

A validated computer model of diabetes was used to project outcomes reported from a randomized clinical trial of LAGB versus SMM in obese patients with type 2 diabetes. Two-year follow-up data from the trial were projected over a 40-year time horizon and cost-effectiveness was assessed from the perspective of the National Health Service. Future costs and clinical outcomes were discounted at 3.5% annually and all costs were reported in 2010 pounds sterling. A series of sensitivity analyses were performed.

Results

LAGB was associated with benefits in HbA1c, systolic blood pressure, body mass index and serum lipid concentrations, which led to significant increases in discounted life expectancy (an increase of 0.64 years) and quality-adjusted life expectancy (an increase of 0.92 quality-adjusted life years, QALYs) and reduced incidence of diabetes complications relative to SMM. Treatment costs in the LAGB arm increased by 4552 Great British Pounds (GBP), but this was partially offset by cost savings resulting from a reduction in the incidence of all modelled diabetes complications. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of GBP 3602 per QALY in the base case fell well below commonly quoted willingness-to-pay thresholds in the UK setting.

Conclusions

On the basis of data from a recent randomized controlled trial, LAGB is likely to be considered cost-effective from the healthcare payer perspective when compared with SMM of obesity in patients with type 2 diabetes in the UK setting.

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