Transitional Cell Carcinoma Involving the Prostate

Authors

  • P. J. CHIBBER,

    Urological Registrar
    1. University Department of Surgery/Urology and Department of Pathology, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh
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  • MARGARET A. MclNTYRE,

    Consultant Pathologist
    1. University Department of Surgery/Urology and Department of Pathology, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh
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  • J. R. HINDMARSH,

    Senior Registrar
    1. University Department of Surgery/Urology and Department of Pathology, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh
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  • T. B. HARGR,

    Senior Lecturer and Honorary Consultant Urologist
    1. University Department of Surgery/Urology and Department of Pathology, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh
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  • J. E. NEWSAM,

    Consultant Surgeon
    1. University Department of Surgery/Urology and Department of Pathology, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh
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  • G. D. CHISHOLM

    Professor of Surgery/ Urology, Corresponding author
    1. University Department of Surgery/Urology and Department of Pathology, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh
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*Department of Surgery/Urology, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU

Abstract

Summary— Transitional cell carcinoma involving the prostate gland was studied in 27 patients. Three different groups were recognized on the basis of the clinical pattern and histological findings. Each group has a different prognosis and merits a different approach to treatment. Thus, stromal involvement of the prostate by transitional cell carcinoma is a sinister finding that requires radical treatment, whereas ductal involvement by either carcinoma in situor non-invasive papillary tumours can be managed less aggressively. This study emphasises that the present classification for these tumours is unsatisfactory and that adequate histopathological information is essential for their management.

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