Prostacyclin in Prostatic Cancer: A Better Marker than Bone Scan or Serum Acid Phosphatase?

Authors

  • O. KHAN,

    Corresponding author
    1. Urology Unit, Department of Surgery and Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Hammersmith Hospital, London
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      O. Khan, FRCS, Research Fellow in Urology.

  • C. N. HENSBY,

    1. Urology Unit, Department of Surgery and Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Hammersmith Hospital, London
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      C. N. Hensby, PhD, Senior Research Officer.

  • GORDON WILLIAMS

    1. Urology Unit, Department of Surgery and Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Hammersmith Hospital, London
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      Gordon Williams, FRCS, Consultant Urologist.


  • Read at the 37th Annual Meeting of the British Association of Urological Surgeons in London, July 1981.

Urology Unit, Department of Surgery, Hammersmith Hospital, Ducane Road, London W12 OHS.

Abstract

Summary— Prostaglandins have been implicated in the development and spread of malignant tumours. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of prostaglandins in benign and malignant prostatic tissue showed that prostacyclin (PGI2), a prostanoid known to induce bone resorption, was the major component. PGI2 is hydrolysed to 6-oxo-PGF1a. Plasma levels of 6-oxo-PFG1a were measured as an index of PGI2 formation in patients with benign and malignant prostatic disease.

The mean plasma 6-oxo- level in an age-matched control group was comparable to that of patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy. A significant elevation was found in patients with a TO carcinoma (P<0.05). Plasma 6-oxo- levels rise with advancing disease and the concentration varied with the degree of tumour differentiation. Plasma 6-oxo- levels were a more accurate monitor of disease progression than tartrate labile acid phosphatase in patients with M1 carcinoma. Persistently elevated levels were associated with a bad prognosis.

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