Perineal Nerve Damage in Genuine Stress Urinary Incontinence; An Electrophysiological Study

Authors

  • S. J. SNOOKS,

    1. The Sir Alan Parks Physiology Unit, St Mark's Hospital and Department of Urology, The London Hospital, London
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    • 2

      FRCS, formerly The Sir Alan Parks Research Fellow, St Mark's Hospital. Now Senior Registrar in General Surgery, St Bartholomew's Hospital, London.

  • D. F. BADENOCH,

    1. The Sir Alan Parks Physiology Unit, St Mark's Hospital and Department of Urology, The London Hospital, London
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      FRCS, Senior Urological Registrar, The London Hospital.

  • R. C. TIPTAFT,

    1. The Sir Alan Parks Physiology Unit, St Mark's Hospital and Department of Urology, The London Hospital, London
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    • 4

      FRCS, Senior Lecturer and Honorary Consultant Urologist, The London Hospital.

  • M. SWASH

    Corresponding author
    1. The Sir Alan Parks Physiology Unit, St Mark's Hospital and Department of Urology, The London Hospital, London
      6 The Sir Alan Parks Physiology Unit, St Mark's Hospital, City Road, London ECIV 2PS.
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    • 5

      MD, FRCP, MRCPath, Director, Department of Physiology, St Mark's Hospital; Consultant Neurologist, St Mark's Hospital and The London Hospital.


6 The Sir Alan Parks Physiology Unit, St Mark's Hospital, City Road, London ECIV 2PS.

Abstract

Summary— Twelve patients with genuine stress incontinence of urine were investigated using manometric and electrophysiological techniques. All were shown to have slowed conduction in the perineal branch of the pudendal nerve which innervates the periurethral striated sphincter muscle. The mean perineal nerve terminal motor latency in these patients was 3.9 ± 0.8 (ms) and in 20 age and parity matched control subjects was 2.0 ±0.2 (ms) (P < 0.001). These results are consistent with a neurogenic factor in patients with genuine stress incontinence of urine which may have implications regarding selection of patients for surgery to restore urethral competence.

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