Immunofluorescentand Histochemical Staining Confirm the Identification of the Many Diseases Called Interstitial Cystitis

Authors

  • LARRIAN GILLESPIE,

    Corresponding author
    1. Women's Clinic for Interstitial Cystitis, Beverly Hills, California, USA
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      Larrian Gillespie, MD, Clinical Instructor, Urology, University of California at Irvine; Director of the Women's Clinic for Interstitial Cystitis, Beverly Hills, California.

  • J. SAID,

    1. Women's Clinic for Interstitial Cystitis, Beverly Hills, California, USA
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      J. Said, MD, Associate Pathologist, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles; Associate Clinical Professor, Pathology, University of California at Los Angeles.

  • S. SOSTRIN,

    1. Women's Clinic for Interstitial Cystitis, Beverly Hills, California, USA
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      S. Sostrin, MD, Associate Clinical Professor, Pathology, University of Southern California.

  • K. KLEIWER

    1. Women's Clinic for Interstitial Cystitis, Beverly Hills, California, USA
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      K. Kliewer, MD, Assistant Clinical Professor, Pathology, University of California at Los Angeles.


The Women's Clinic for Interstitial Cystitis, 120 S. Spalding Dr. #210, Beverly Hills, California 90212, USA.

Abstract

Summary— Interstitial cystitis comprises a complex of diseases typified by symptoms of pelvic pain. Functional complaints do not aid the clinician in determining loss of anatomical capacity. Histochemical staining with PAS-colloidal iron/Van Geison's counterstain offers improved diagnostic ability for the pathologist and correlates well with immunofluorescent findings. Four distinct diseases can be identified through immunofluorescent staining, indicating that each is the result of different responses of the urothelium and endothelium to injury. Loss of bladder capacity associated with these diseases can be expected with age, but immunofluorescent staining for IgM within the capillaries of the interstitium is a more sensitive predictor.

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