Prognostic relevance of capsular involvement and collecting system invasion in stage I and II renal cell carcinoma

Authors


Arie S. Belldegrun, Professor of Urology, Chief, Division of Urologic Oncology, Roy and Carol Doumani Chair in Urologic Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 66–118 CHS, Box 951738, Los Angeles, CA 90095–1738, USA.e-mail: abelldegrun@mednet.ucla.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To define the prognostic relevance of capsular involvement (invasion with no penetration) and collecting-system invasion in patients with stage I (pT1N0M0) and stage II (pT2N0M0) renal cell carcinoma (RCC), by evaluating the outcome of patients treated with nephrectomy.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

In all, 519 patients from a kidney cancer database treated with nephrectomy for stage I and II RCC between 1985 and 2005 were assessed retrospectively. The primary endpoint was recurrence-free survival time. The prognostic relevance of capsular involvement and collecting-system invasion were examined using univariate and multivariate survival analysis.

RESULTS

Capsular involvement and collecting-system invasion were evident in 112 (21.6%) and 39 (7.5%) patients, respectively. Capsular involvement was associated with higher Fuhrman grades and larger tumours. The incidence of collecting-system invasion was higher in patients with microvascular invasion. The median follow-up was 49 months. In univariate analysis, patients with capsular involvement and collecting-system invasion had a worse prognosis than patients without (P = 0.007 and <0.001, respectively). In multivariate analysis, capsular involvement (hazard ratio 1.84, P = 0.036) and collecting-system invasion (3.78, P < 0.001) were independent prognostic factors of recurrence-free survival. Interestingly, there was no survival difference between patients with capsular involvement in stage I/II and patients with invasion of perinephric tissue (pT3aN0M0).

CONCLUSIONS

These findings suggest that capsular involvement and collecting-system invasion are poor prognostic findings in stage I and II RCC. They should both be considered when planning the follow-up. A revised pT3a stage including patients with capsular involvement could improve its prognostic validity.

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