Artificial urinary sphincter (AMS 800) implantation for women with intrinsic sphincter deficiency: a technique for insiders?

Authors

  • Emmanuel Chartier-Kastler,

    1. Department of Urology, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Pierre and Marie Curie Medical School, Paris VI, Paris, France, Gynaecological Surgery, Jeanne-de-Flandre Hospital, University Hospital Centre Lille, Lille, France, §Le Mans Hospital Centre, Le Mans, France, Department of Urology, Bourgogne Polyclinic, Chalon–sur-Saône, France, *Department of Urology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands, Department of Urology, Lüneburg Hospital, Lüneburg, Germany
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  • Philip Van Kerrebroeck,

    1. Department of Urology, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Pierre and Marie Curie Medical School, Paris VI, Paris, France, Gynaecological Surgery, Jeanne-de-Flandre Hospital, University Hospital Centre Lille, Lille, France, §Le Mans Hospital Centre, Le Mans, France, Department of Urology, Bourgogne Polyclinic, Chalon–sur-Saône, France, *Department of Urology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands, Department of Urology, Lüneburg Hospital, Lüneburg, Germany
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  • Roberto Olianas,

    1. Department of Urology, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Pierre and Marie Curie Medical School, Paris VI, Paris, France, Gynaecological Surgery, Jeanne-de-Flandre Hospital, University Hospital Centre Lille, Lille, France, §Le Mans Hospital Centre, Le Mans, France, Department of Urology, Bourgogne Polyclinic, Chalon–sur-Saône, France, *Department of Urology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands, Department of Urology, Lüneburg Hospital, Lüneburg, Germany
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  • Michel Cosson,

    1. Department of Urology, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Pierre and Marie Curie Medical School, Paris VI, Paris, France, Gynaecological Surgery, Jeanne-de-Flandre Hospital, University Hospital Centre Lille, Lille, France, §Le Mans Hospital Centre, Le Mans, France, Department of Urology, Bourgogne Polyclinic, Chalon–sur-Saône, France, *Department of Urology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands, Department of Urology, Lüneburg Hospital, Lüneburg, Germany
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  • Eric Mandron,

    1. Department of Urology, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Pierre and Marie Curie Medical School, Paris VI, Paris, France, Gynaecological Surgery, Jeanne-de-Flandre Hospital, University Hospital Centre Lille, Lille, France, §Le Mans Hospital Centre, Le Mans, France, Department of Urology, Bourgogne Polyclinic, Chalon–sur-Saône, France, *Department of Urology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands, Department of Urology, Lüneburg Hospital, Lüneburg, Germany
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  • Emmanuel Delorme,

    1. Department of Urology, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Pierre and Marie Curie Medical School, Paris VI, Paris, France, Gynaecological Surgery, Jeanne-de-Flandre Hospital, University Hospital Centre Lille, Lille, France, §Le Mans Hospital Centre, Le Mans, France, Department of Urology, Bourgogne Polyclinic, Chalon–sur-Saône, France, *Department of Urology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands, Department of Urology, Lüneburg Hospital, Lüneburg, Germany
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  • François Richard

    1. Department of Urology, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Pierre and Marie Curie Medical School, Paris VI, Paris, France, Gynaecological Surgery, Jeanne-de-Flandre Hospital, University Hospital Centre Lille, Lille, France, §Le Mans Hospital Centre, Le Mans, France, Department of Urology, Bourgogne Polyclinic, Chalon–sur-Saône, France, *Department of Urology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands, Department of Urology, Lüneburg Hospital, Lüneburg, Germany
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Emmanuel Chartier-Kastler, Department of Urology, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Pierre and Marie Curie Medical School Paris VI, 83, Boulevard de l’Hopital, 75651 Paris Cedex 13, France.
e-mail: emmanuel.chartier-kastler@psl.ap-hop-paris.fr

Abstract

Study Type – Therapy (case series)
Level of Evidence 4

Artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) implantation is one of several surgical options for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence. It is indicated for women with both clinically and urodynamically defined intrinsic sphincter deficiency that significantly affects quality of life. The erosion/revision risk increases after several previous surgical interventions. Therefore, women believed to be candidates for AUS implantation should be rapidly (after the failure of a maximum of two previous surgical procedures) referred to specialized centres, where the knowledge and experience concerning the diagnosis, surgery and management of female stress urinary incontinence is concentrated. To refer correctly, non-academic urologists/gynaecologists should also be well informed about AUS implantation. Only in this way can the patient weigh the high long-term success rate and high quality of life improvement of AUS implantation against the greater complication/revision risk and take a well-considered decision.

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