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Keywords:

  • erectile dysfunction;
  • animal model;
  • inflammation;
  • neuropraxia

Study Type – Aetiology (case control)

Level of Evidence 3b

What's known on the subject? and What does the study add?

Penile rehabilitation is still controversial regarding good results. Our study shows a non-invasive treatment option to recovery after cavernous nervous damage.

The assessment of changes in the intracavernous pressure and karyometry demonstrates the protective effect of annexin-A1 in an animal model of cavernous nerve injury. We found that annexin-A1 effectively preserved erectile function, evidently through significantly protecting the corpus cavernosum tissue against fibrosis.

OBJECTIVE

  • • 
    To evaluate the protective effect of annexin-A1 against irreversible damage to cavernous tissue after cavernous nerve injury.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

  • • 
    Thirty Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided into 3 groups; sham-operated rats (n= 10), bilateral cavernous nerve injury treated intravenously with 100 µg/kg annexin-A1 (n= 10), and a crush group of rats submitted to bilateral cavernous nerve injury and vehicle (n= 10). Groups were compared in respect to intracavernous pressure and karyometric parameters.

RESULTS

  • • 
    After annexin-A1 treatment, the maximum changes in intracavernous pressure responses were significantly higher in the annexin-A1 group compared to the vehicle-only group on the 7th postoperative day (p-value <0.05). Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that the percentage of cavernosal smooth muscle was higher in the annexin-A1 group. Karyometry showed that the nuclear volume was greater in the annexin-A1 group, as was the major/minor smooth muscle cell diameter ratio compared to the vehicle-only group on the 7th postoperative day (p-value <0.05).

CONCLUSION

  • • 
    This is the first report that, by assessing changes in the intracavernous pressure and karyometry, demonstrates the protective effect of annexin-A1 in an animal model of cavernous nerve injury. We found that annexin-A1 effectively preserved erectile function, evidently through significantly protecting the corpus cavernosum tissue against fibrosis.