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Keywords:

  • buried penis;
  • surgical procedure;
  • abnormalities

What's known on the subject? and What does the study add?

  • Surgical correction of the congenital completely buried penis (CCBP) is a difficult challenge and there is no unanimous consensus about the surgical ‘gold standard’ and patient eligibility for surgery.
  • In the present study, dysgenetic fundiform ligaments were found to be attached to the distal or middle shaft of the penis. This abnormality can be successfully corrected by releasing the fundiform ligament and mobilising the scrotal skin to cover the length of the penile shaft. The study shows that the paucity and traction of the penile skin and an abnormal fundiform ligament are important anatomical defects in CCBP. Dorsal curve and severe shortage of penile skin in erectile conditions are the main indications for surgical correction.

Objective

  • To present our experience of anatomical findings for congenital completely buried penis (CCBP), which has no unanimous consensus regarding the ‘gold standard’ for surgical correction and patient eligibility, by providing our surgical technique and illustrations.

Patients and Methods

  • Between February 2006 and February 2011, 22 children with a median (range) age of 4.2 (2.5–5.8) years, with CCBP underwent surgical correction by one surgeon.
  • Toilet training and photographs of morning erections by parents were advised before surgery.
  • The abnormal anatomical structure of buried penis during the operation was observed. The technique consisted of the release of the fundiform ligament, fixation of the subcutaneous penile skin at the base of the degloved penis, penoscrotal Z-plasty and mobilisation of the penile and scrotal skin to cover the penile shaft.

Results

  • In reflex erectile conditions, CCBP presents varying degrees of dorsal curve and shortage of penile skin.
  • Dysgenetic fundiform ligaments were found to be attached to the distal or middle shaft of the penis in all patients.
  • All wounds healed well and the cosmetic outcome was good at 6-month follow-up after the repair.

Conclusion

  • The appearance of the dorsal curve in CCBP mainly results from the traction of penile dorsal skin and the abnormal attachment of the fundiform ligament to the shaft. This abnormality can be successfully corrected by releasing the abnormal fundiform ligament and mobilising scrotal skin to cover the length of the penile shaft.