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Does metformin decrease blood pressure in patients with Type 2 diabetes intensively treated with insulin?

Authors


Adriaan Kooy MD PhD, Department of Internal Medicine, Bethesda General Hospital, Dr G. H. Amshoffweg 1, 7909 AA Hoogeveen, the Netherlands. E-mail: kooy.a@bethesda.nl

Abstract

Aims  We investigated in a double-blind study whether metformin reduces blood pressure (BP) in patients with Type 2 diabetes intensively treated with insulin.

Methods  A total of 220 patients with Type 2 diabetes were asked to undergo 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (24-h ABPM). One hundred and eighty-two gave informed consent. Eighty-nine were randomized to metformin and 93 to placebo. Thirty-five subjects dropped out (13 placebo, 22 metformin users); 147 patients underwent a second 24-h ABPM, 16 weeks after randomization.

Results  Systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), pulse BP (PP), mean BP (MP) and heart rate (HR) were measured as office BP measurements and as 24-h ABPM for 24-h, day and night. Office BP measurements did not differ significantly between the placebo- and metformin-treated groups for any BP measure, but showed a non-significant trend for SBP reduction with metformin use (mean baseline-adjusted difference, metformin minus placebo: −4.2 mmHg, 95% CI, −9.9 to +1.5; P = 0.15). The baseline-adjusted differences of the ambulatory measurements were −0.2 mmHg (95% CI, −2.9 to +2.6) for the 24-h SBP, and +1.1 mmHg (95% CI, −0.7 to +2.8) for the 24-h DBP. On the whole, BP differences between metformin- and placebo-treated groups were not statistically significant. The only significant difference was for night-time PP (baseline-adjusted difference: −2.2 mmHg; 95% CI, −4.2 to −0.2). These results were not different after adjustment for age and diabetes duration, or for (changes in) body mass index, glycated haemoglobin, insulin dose or plasma homocysteine.

Conclusion  Metformin does not significantly affect BP in patients with Type 2 diabetes intensively treated with insulin.

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