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Time trends in absolute and modifiable coronary heart disease risk in patients with Type 2 diabetes in the Swedish National Diabetes Register (NDR) 2003–2008

Authors


Eva Fhärm, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden. E-mail: eva.fharm@fammed.umu.se

Abstract

Diabet. Med. 29, 198–206 (2012)

Abstract

Aims  The aim was to evaluate treatment goal achievements early in the course of Type 2 diabetes, and their effect on 10-year risk of coronary heart disease in patients receiving usual care.

Methods  Assessment of risk factor control 3 years after diagnosis in patients with Type 2 diabetes with no previous coronary heart disease included from the Swedish National Diabetes Register; a total of 19 382 patients (mean age 58 years) in cross-sectional surveys from 2003 to 2008, and a subgroup of 4293 patients followed individually from year of diagnosis to follow-up after a mean 2.6 years. Estimation of absolute 10-year risk of coronary heart disease using the UK Prospective Diabetes Study risk engine, and modifiable 10-year risk defined as percentage excess risk above patients with ‘normal’ risk factor values.

Results  Treatment goals for HbA1c, blood pressure, total and LDL cholesterol were achieved in 78.4, 65.5, 55.6% and 61.0%, respectively, in the cross-sectional survey in 2008, following a trend of generally improved control. In the individually followed patients in the subgroup, mean absolute 10-year coronary heart disease risk increased from 13.7% (men/women 16.9/9.5%) to 14.2 (men/women 17.6/9.6%) (P < 0.001) from year of diagnosis to follow-up after 2.6 years, while mean modifiable risk decreased from 37.7% (men/women 28.6/49.9%) to 19.1% (13.2/26.9%) (P < 0.001 in all).

Conclusions  A high achievement of treatment goals and a low mean modifiable 10-year coronary heart disease risk was found at the 3-year follow-up, both in the cross-sectional survey in 2008 and in patients individually followed since diagnosis. This indicates the feasibility and significance of early multifactorial risk factor treatment.

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