Implementing a smoking cessation program in social and community service organisations: A feasibility and acceptability trial

Authors


Jamie Bryant BPsyc (Hons), HMRI Research Associate, Billie Bonevski BA, PhD, CINSW Research Fellow, Christine Paul BA (Hons), PhD, Senior Research Academic, Philip Hull BA, Grad Dip Psych, Grad Cert (Alcohol and Drug Studies), Jon O'Brien BA, MEd, Senior Program Coordinator. Ms Jamie Bryant, Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia. Tel: +61 2 4913 8618; Fax: +61 2 4913 8601; E-mail: jamie.bryant@newcastle.edu.au

Abstract

Introduction and Aims. Novel ways of accessing and engaging smokers who are socially and economically disadvantaged may help reduce socioeconomic disparities in smoking rates. This study assessed the feasibility and acceptability of integrating smoking cessation support into usual care at a social and community service organisation (SCSO).

Design and Methods. One SCSO providing a Personal Helpers and Mentors program participated. Support workers were provided with training in 5A's, brief motivational interviewing and use of nicotine replacement therapy, and then recruited clients into a 6 month smoking program. Acceptability and feasibility was assessed prior to receiving training and at 3 and 6 month follow up for support workers, and at enrolment into the program and at 4 and 6 month follow up for clients.

Results. Six support workers (67%) and 20 of their clients (65%) took part. Overall acceptability of the program was high, particularly among clients. The amount of time spent talking about smoking increased from 3.8 min per visit at baseline to 15.5 min at 6 month follow up. There was a significant reduction in the number of cigarettes smoked from 20.5 cigarettes per day at baseline to 15 cigarettes per day at 6 month follow up (P = 0.04).

Discussion and Conclusions. SCSOs are both interested in and capable of providing smoking care and the majority of clients found the smoking cessation intervention acceptable and helpful. Given the demonstrated acceptability and feasibility of this approach, further research to determine the effectiveness of this approach is warranted.[Bryant J, Bonevski B, Paul C, Hull P, O'Brien J. Implementing a smoking cessation program in social and community service organisations: A feasibility and acceptability trial. Drug Alcohol Rev 2012;31:678–684]

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