An evaluation of a pilot capacity building initiative for smoking cessation in social and community services: The Smoking Care project

Authors


Jon O'Brien BA, Med, Senior Program Coordinator, Billie Bonevski BA (Hons), PhD, CINSW Research Fellow, Allison Salmon BPsych, MPH, PhD, Manager, Wendy Oakes BSc, MPH, Primary Health Care Program Manager, Brendan Goodger PhD, Branch Manager, Dias Soewido BDS, DDS, MHSM, MPH, Senior Project Officer. Mr Jon O'Brien, Tobacco Control Unit, Cancer Council NSW, PO Box 572, Kings Cross, NSW 1340, Australia. Tel: +61 2 9334 1848; Fax: +61 2 8302 3530; E-mail: jonb@nswcc.org.au

Abstract

Introduction and Aims. New strategies are required to reach subpopulations with high smoking rates. This study reports on an evaluation of the Smoking Care intervention—a 2-year organisational capacity building strategy—for social and community service organisations (SCSOs) to provide smoking care to clients.

Design and Methods. The Smoking Care intervention consisted of: awareness raising seminars (half-day); smoking cessation training (1 day) and; nicotine replacement therapy grants (3 months). Baseline and 3-month follow-up data were collected within participating SCSOs and the primary outcomes measured were: changes in staff attitudes, confidence and practice of smoking cessation care. Changes in client self-reported smoking behaviours, quit attempts and interest in quitting were also measured.

Results. Of 600 staff who attended training, 306 (51%) returned pre- and post-intervention surveys. At 3-month follow-up staff reported statistically significant increases in positive attitudes to providing smoking cessation care, increased confidence in providing such care and increases in cessation practice. Of 400 client surveys distributed, 367 (92%) were returned at pre-intervention and 255 (64%) at post-intervention. Fewer clients reported daily smoking at post-intervention, while use of nicotine replacement therapy and group counselling increased significantly. Client interest in quitting and receiving quit support from case workers was high at both pre- and post-intervention.

Discussion and Conclusions. The intervention had an impact on SCSO staff attitudes, confidence and provision of smoking care. Results show clients were receptive to this support. More rigorous testing of similar interventions in SCSOs is warranted.[O'Brien J, Bonevski B, Salmon A, Oakes W, Goodger B, Soewido D. An evaluation of a pilot capacity building initiative for smoking cessation in social and community services: The Smoking Care project. Drug Alcohol Rev 2012;31:685–692].

Ancillary