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A SIBLINGS ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION ONSET ON EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

Authors

  • SF Koch,

    1. Department of Finance and Economics, Georgia Southern University, PO Box 8151, Statesboro, GA 30460-8151, USA, Phone: 1 912 681 0589, Fax: 1 912 871 1835 E-mail: skoch@gasou.edu
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  • DC Ribar

    1. Department of Economics, The George Washington University, 2201 G Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA, Phone: 1 202 994 7608, Fax: 1 202 994 6147 E-mail: dcr7@gwu.edu
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    • *

      Earlier Drafts of this article, titled “A Siblings Analysis of the Socioeconomic Consequences of Alcohol Consumption,” were presented at the Annual Health Economics Conference, June 1998, at Cornell University and at the Western Economic Association Meetings, June 1999, in San Diego. We thank Don Kenkel for sharing his computer code and for helpful discussions.We also thank William Cartwright and several anonymous referees for their valuable comments.


Abstract

This article examines the relationship between youthful drinking and educational attainment using data on same-sex siblings pairs from the 1979–90 panels of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. We consider different estimators that can be constructed using siblings data, including estimators that adopt key restrictions of the standard regression, family fixed effect, and instrumental variable approaches. We also consider the properties of these estimators under more general conditions and show that under very plausible assumptions the effect of drinking on schooling can be bounded. The study finds that estimates of the schooling consequences of youthful drinking are very sensitive to specification issues. The research concludes that the actual effects of youthful drinking on education are likely to be small.

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