HOW KNOWLEDGE AFFECTS PAYMENT TO CONSERVE AN ENDANGERED BIRD

Authors

  • CLEVO WILSON,

    1. Wilson: Lecturer, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001, Australia. E-mail clevo.wilson@qut.edu.au
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      This is a revised version of a paper presented at the Western Economic Association International 79th Annual Conference, Vancouver, Canada, July 2004, in a session organized by Clem Tisdell, The University of Queensland, Australia. This article has benefited from an Australian Research Council grant for a study on the economics of conserving Australia’s tropical wildlife and support from The University of Queensland, Australia. We are thankful to Dr. Steven Van Dyck, Curator of Mammals and Birds, Queensland Museum, for the several presentations he made for the benefit of participants and for bringing many preserved specimens from the museum to show to the survey participants. We thank the staff at David Fleay Conservation Park, especially Sue Beckinsale, for assistance with our third survey. We wish to thank Beryl Rajbhandari, Hemanath Swarna, and Viet Ngu Hoang for research assistance. Finally, we wish to thank the anonymous referees for their useful comments.

  • CLEM TISDELL

    1. Tisdell: Emeritus Professor, School of Economics, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia. E-mail c.tisdell@economics.uq.edu.au
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    • *

      This is a revised version of a paper presented at the Western Economic Association International 79th Annual Conference, Vancouver, Canada, July 2004, in a session organized by Clem Tisdell, The University of Queensland, Australia. This article has benefited from an Australian Research Council grant for a study on the economics of conserving Australia’s tropical wildlife and support from The University of Queensland, Australia. We are thankful to Dr. Steven Van Dyck, Curator of Mammals and Birds, Queensland Museum, for the several presentations he made for the benefit of participants and for bringing many preserved specimens from the museum to show to the survey participants. We thank the staff at David Fleay Conservation Park, especially Sue Beckinsale, for assistance with our third survey. We wish to thank Beryl Rajbhandari, Hemanath Swarna, and Viet Ngu Hoang for research assistance. Finally, we wish to thank the anonymous referees for their useful comments.


Abstract

The paper reports the findings of an experimental survey conducted to determine the public’s willingness to pay (WTP) for the protection and conservation of the golden-shouldered parrot in Australia. This parrot is endemic to Australia and is one of Australia’s most endangered birds. The paper examines the public’s knowledge of this parrot and compares it with other endangered birds as well as common birds and the public’s WTP for conservation from a hypothetical allocation of money based on their current knowledge. We then examine how this allocation changes with increased knowledge about all species.

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