LANGUAGE-RELATED DIFFERENCES IN ENVIRONMENTAL BENEFITS ESTIMATION: EVIDENCE FROM A MAIL SURVEY

Authors

  • XIAOLIN REN,

    1. Ren: Graduate Research Assistant, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois,1301 W. Gregory Drive, Room 326, Urbana, IL 61801. Phone 217-333-1810; Fax 217-333-2312; E-mail xren@uiuc.edu
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      This work was supported in part by grants GL-97569901 and GL-96553601 from the Great Lakes National Program Office, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and project 0305 of the Illinois Agricultural Experiment Station. The authors thank Vic Adamowicz, John Loomis, Allegra Cangelosi, Lisa Kelly-Wilson, Jordan Louviere, Nicole Mays, and officials of Lake County, Illinois, for their advice and assistance. Any views or conclusions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the sponsors or advisors.

  • ARIANTO A. PATUNRU,

    1. Patunru: Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, Universitas Indonesia, LPEM-FEUI Jalan Salemba Raya 4, Jakarta, 10430, Indonesia. Phone (+62)21-314-3177, Fax (+61)21-319-34310, E-mail patunru@lpem-feui.org
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      This work was supported in part by grants GL-97569901 and GL-96553601 from the Great Lakes National Program Office, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and project 0305 of the Illinois Agricultural Experiment Station. The authors thank Vic Adamowicz, John Loomis, Allegra Cangelosi, Lisa Kelly-Wilson, Jordan Louviere, Nicole Mays, and officials of Lake County, Illinois, for their advice and assistance. Any views or conclusions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the sponsors or advisors.

  • JOHN B. BRADEN

    1. Braden: Professor, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 61801. Phone 217-333-5501, Fax 217-333-2312, E-mail jbb@uiuc.edu
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      This work was supported in part by grants GL-97569901 and GL-96553601 from the Great Lakes National Program Office, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and project 0305 of the Illinois Agricultural Experiment Station. The authors thank Vic Adamowicz, John Loomis, Allegra Cangelosi, Lisa Kelly-Wilson, Jordan Louviere, Nicole Mays, and officials of Lake County, Illinois, for their advice and assistance. Any views or conclusions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the sponsors or advisors.


Abstract

In contingent valuation studies, failing to accommodate populations with limited language skills might yield biased estimates. In the United States, there are many residents primarily fluent in Spanish. This study uses conditional logit models applied to data from a bilingual (English and Spanish) conjoint choice mail survey to evaluate the effects of language proficiency on estimates of the economic benefits of contaminated site cleanup. Results indicate that language does have significant effects on welfare estimates. The results suggest that mail surveys addressing environmental issues that may affect a linguistically diverse population should be designed at the outset with multiple languages in mind. (JEL Q51, J19)

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