A WARM EMBRACE OR THE COLD SHOULDER? WAGE AND EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES IN ETHNIC ENCLAVES

Authors

  • ROBERTO PEDACE,

    1. Pedace: Department of Economics, Scripps College, Claremont, CA 91711. Phone 909-607-3368, Fax 909-607-3368-7142, E-mail rpedace@scrippscollege.edu
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  • STEPHANIE ROHN KUMAR

    1. Rohn Kumar: School of Policy, Planning, and Development, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089. Phone 408-504-0554, E-mail rohn@usc.edu
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    • The paper benefited from the suggestions of Cynthia Bansak, Stephen Conroy, Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes, Mary Lopez, participants of the 82nd Annual Conference of the Western Economic Association International, and two anonymous referees. The authors also thank Rebecca Acosta, Abigail Cooke, Kevin McKinney, and Arnold Reznek for their help in acquiring access to the data. Financial support provided by the Haynes Foundation was greatly appreciated. The data used are confidential under Title 13, United States Code. Access was obtained through the Center for Economic Studies (CES) at the U.S. Census Bureau. Researchers can access the data files with a CES-approved proposal (see http://www.ces.census.gov). The analysis was conducted while the authors were Special Sworn Status researchers of the U.S. Census Bureau at the California Census Research Data Center, Los Angeles. Research results and conclusions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Census Bureau. This paper has been screened to insure that no confidential data are revealed.


Abstract

This paper examines how immigrant enclaves influence labor market outcomes. We examine the effect of variation in ethnic concentration across counties and county subdivisions on both immigrant earnings and employment using the non-public use, 1-in-6 sample of the 2000 U.S. Census. We find that there is heterogeneity in enclave impacts by ethnic group and skill composition of the enclave. While some groups tend to suffer from lower wages and employment propensities when residing in areas with larger ethnic concentrations, others have higher wages and improved employment opportunities in enclaves. (JEL J61, J15, R23)

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