PROFESSIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS AND GENDER DIFFERENCES AMONG ACADEMIC ECONOMISTS

Authors

  • IVY E. BRODER

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    • *Professor of Economics, The American University. John Braley III was an excellent research assistant during his internship at the National Science Foundation (NSF). John F. Morrall III and the editors and referees of this journal rovided many substantive comments on earlier dress of this work. I would also like to thank Daniel Newlon, Ron Ehrenberg and Nancy Folbre for their thoughtful comments. The data collection phase of this paper took place while the author was Program Director of the Economics Program at the NSF. However, the views expressed do not reflect those of the Foundation.


Abstract

This paper tests for gender differences in remuneration and professional achievement among academic economists using data on grants and grant applications to the National Science Foundation. A simultaneous equations model is used to examine the determinants of salary, rank, department affiliation and research output. In addition to confirming some long-standing folklore about the composition of faculty in research-oriented institutions, significant gender differences were found among older cohorts. Although the signs of the gender coefficients are consistent with a discrimination hypothesis for the sample of assistant professors, the results were not statistically significant.

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