WHAT DETERMINES CORRUPTION? INTERNATIONAL EVIDENCE FROM MICRODATA

Authors

  • NACI MOCAN

    1. Mocan: Ourso Distinguished Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University, 2119 Patrick F. Taylor Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-6306, and Research Associate, National Bureau of Economic Research, 365 Fifth Avenue, Fifth Floor, New York, NY 10016-4309. Phone 225-578-4570, Fax 225-578-3807, E-mail mocan@lsu.edu
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      I thank Paul Mahler, Michelle McCown, Umut ?zek, and Norovsambuu Tumennasan for excellent research assistance, and Murat Iyigun, Patrick Emerson, Erdal Tekin, seminar participants at Bilkent and Bogazici Universities, and two anonymous referees for helpful comments.


Abstract

This paper uses a microlevel data set from 49 countries to create a direct measure of corruption, which portrays the extent of bribery as revealed by individuals who live in those countries. In addition, it investigates the determinants of being asked for a bribe at the individual level. The results show that both personal and country characteristics determine the risk of exposure to bribery. Examples are gender, income, education, marital status, the city size, the country’s unemployment rate, average education, and the strength of the institutions in the country. (JEL K4, D73 P16)

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