HAVE EFFORTS TO REDUCE SMOKING REALLY CONTRIBUTED TO THE OBESITY EPIDEMIC?

Authors

  • JAMES NONNEMAKER,

    1. Nonnemaker: Research Economist, Health, Social and Economic Research, RTI International, 3040 Cornwallis Road, PO Box 12194, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194. Phone (919) 541-7064, Fax (919) 541-6683, E-mail jnonnemaker@rti.org
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      This research was supported by Grant 1 P30 CD000138-01 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to the RTI-UNC Center of Excellence in Health Promotion Economics. We thank Michael Grossman and Jonathan Gruber for their help during the preparation of this manuscript. We also thank Susan Murchie for editorial assistance.

  • ERIC FINKELSTEIN,

    1. Finkelstein: Program Director, Health, Social, and Economic Research, RTI International, 3040 Cornwallis Road, PO Box 12194, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194. Phone (919) 541-8074, Fax (919) 541-6683, E-mail finkelse@rti.org
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      This research was supported by Grant 1 P30 CD000138-01 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to the RTI-UNC Center of Excellence in Health Promotion Economics. We thank Michael Grossman and Jonathan Gruber for their help during the preparation of this manuscript. We also thank Susan Murchie for editorial assistance.

  • MARK ENGELEN,

    1. Engelen: Associate Economist, Health, Social, and Economic Research, RTI International, 3040 Cornwallis Road, PO Box 12194, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194. Phone (919) 316-3436, Fax (919) 541-6683, E-mail mengelen@rti.org
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      This research was supported by Grant 1 P30 CD000138-01 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to the RTI-UNC Center of Excellence in Health Promotion Economics. We thank Michael Grossman and Jonathan Gruber for their help during the preparation of this manuscript. We also thank Susan Murchie for editorial assistance.

  • THOMAS HOERGER,

    1. Hoerger: Senior Fellow, RTI International, 3040 Cornwallis Road, PO Box 12194, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194. Phone (919) 541-7146, Fax (919) 541-6683, E-mail tjh@rti.org
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    • *

      This research was supported by Grant 1 P30 CD000138-01 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to the RTI-UNC Center of Excellence in Health Promotion Economics. We thank Michael Grossman and Jonathan Gruber for their help during the preparation of this manuscript. We also thank Susan Murchie for editorial assistance.

  • MATTHEW FARRELLY

    1. Farrelly: Senior Program Director, Health, Social, and Economic Research, RTI International, 3040 Cornwallis Road, PO Box 12194, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194. Phone (919) 541-6852, Fax (919) 541-6683, E-mail mcf@rti.org
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    • *

      This research was supported by Grant 1 P30 CD000138-01 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to the RTI-UNC Center of Excellence in Health Promotion Economics. We thank Michael Grossman and Jonathan Gruber for their help during the preparation of this manuscript. We also thank Susan Murchie for editorial assistance.

Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: ERRATUM Volume 47, Issue 3, 603, Article first published online: 20 July 2009

Abstract

Two of the most notable trends in public health over the past 30 yr are the reductions in smoking rates and the rapid rise in obesity rates. Several studies have investigated the relationship between these trends but have drawn different conclusions. In this article, we revisit this issue, attempting to clarify the prior discrepant results. Overall, we find no support for the claim that rising cigarette taxes have significantly contributed to rising obesity rates. Instead, we find only a moderately sized effect among former smokers. (JEL I12)

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