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IMPLICATIONS OF IMMIGRATION POLICIES FOR THE U.S. FARM SECTOR AND WORKFORCE

Authors

  • STEPHEN DEVADOSS,

    1. Devadoss: Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-2334. Phone 1-208-885-6806, Fax 1-208-885-5759, E-mail devadoss@uidaho.edu
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  • JEFF LUCKSTEAD

    1. Luckstead: Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-2334. Phone 1-208-885-6806, Fax 1-208-885-5759, E-mail jeff.luckstead@vandals.uidaho.edu
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    • *The authors gratefully acknowledge the helpful comments of the coeditor Vincenzo Quadrini and two anonymous reviewers. We also thank Victoria Seever for editorial work. This research was partially supported by Grant No. BD2056 from the Student Grant Program at the University of Idaho, and by the Edward J. and Maude R. Iddings Research Fellowship, College of Agriculture and Life Science, University of Idaho.


Abstract

We develop a theoretical model using migration and trade theory to examine the effects of domestic and border enforcement policies on unauthorized workers and the U.S. agricultural sector. The theoretical results show that heightened immigration policies increase the illegal farm wage rate, and reduce the employment of unauthorized farm workers and exports. The empirical analysis show that increased domestic enforcements curtail the number of undocumented farm workers by an average of 8,947 and commodity exports to Mexico by an average of $180 million. The tighter border control curbs illegal farm workers by 8,147 and reduces farm exports by $181 million. (JEL F160)

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