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International partnerships and the development of a Sister Hospital Programme

Authors

  • D. Brown RN, PhD, MACN, AFCHSM,

    Corresponding author
    1. Project Coordinator, Sister Hospital Program, RSUP Sanglah, Bali & Royal Darwin Hospital, NT
    2. Professorial Fellow, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT, Australia
      Dr Di Brown, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, NT, 0810, Australia; Tel: 089226170; E-mail: dibrown456@gmail.com.
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  • G. Rickard RN, DPH, MACN, OAM,

    1. Head, National and Key Accounts, Health Care Australia Pty Ltd., Sydney, NSW (formerly Principal Nursing Advisor, Department of Health, NT, Australia)
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  • K.A. Mustriwati SKep, MPH,

    1. Director of Clinical Education Service, RSUP Sanglah, Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia (formerly Director of Nursing, RSUP Sanglah)
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  • J. Seiler RN, DBA (CANDIDATE)

    1. Executive Director of Nursing, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, NT, Australia
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  • Funding: This programme was funded by the Government of the Northern Territory of Australia.

  • Conflict of Interest: No conflict of interest has been declared by the author(s).

Dr Di Brown, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, NT, 0810, Australia; Tel: 089226170; E-mail: dibrown456@gmail.com.

Abstract

BROWN D., RICKARD G., MUSTRIWATI K.A. & SEILER J. (2013) International partnerships and the development of a Sister Hospital Program. International Nursing Review60, 45–51

Background:  Despite some progress in meeting the Millennium Development Goals, there are still major discrepancies in health service provision between developed and developing countries. Nurses are key players to improving the quality of health services. Increasingly, partnerships are being initiated between nurses of different countries to enable those working in developing countries to improve standards of clinical care.

Aim:  This paper describes a partnership between two major teaching hospitals: one in Indonesia and one in Australia, designed to assist in improving standards of clinical care within the Indonesian hospital.

Methods:  The nature of the partnership, conceptualized as a Sister Hospital Program, is described. The processes and outcomes of the pilot programme conducted in 2011 are outlined. A brief description of the methods used to gain financial support from the Northern Territory Government is provided. The programme offered a skills development programme for selected staff from Sanglah General Hospital in Bali at Royal Darwin Hospital in northern Australia.

Instruments:  The paper uses Green's PROCEED-PRECEDE framework both to describe and evaluate the pilot programme.

Results:  The skills development programme was enthusiastically evaluated by staff from both hospitals and has led to major changes in the management of patients within the Emergency Department of Sanglah General Hospital. The success of the pilot has resulted in longer-term funding by the Australian government.

Wider policy outcomes:  The partnership model described in the paper is submitted as a possible framework for others wishing to build long-term and collaborative relationships between nurses of different nations.

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