SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

SUMMARY

Nineteen dogs were assigned randomly to one of three groups. Animals in Group 1 were pre-medicated with acepromazine, 50 μg/kg bodyweight (bwt) intramuscularly (im) and received 10 ml of 0.9 per cent saline intravenously (iv) at the time of skin incision. Dogs in Group 2 were pre-medicated with acepromazine, 50 μg/kg bwt im, and received fentanyl 2 μg/kg bwt iv at skin incision. Dogs in Group 3 were pre-medicated with acepromazine, 50 μg/kg bwt and atropine, 30 to 40 μg/kg bwt, im and received fentanyl, 2 μg/kg bwt iv at skin incision. Pulse rate, mean arterial blood pressure, respiratory rate and end tidal carbon dioxide were measured before and after fentanyl or saline injection. Fentanyl caused a short-lived fall in arterial blood pressure that was significant in dogs premedicated with acepromazine, but not in dogs pre-medicated with acepromazine and atropine. A significant bradycardia was evident for 5 mins in both fentanyl treated groups. The effect on respiratory rate was most pronounced in Group 3, in which four of seven dogs required intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) for up to 14 mins. Two of six dogs in Group 2 required IPPV, whereas respiratory rate remained unaltered in the saline controls. The quality of anaesthesia was excellent in the fentanyl treated groups; however, caution is urged with the use of even low doses of fentanyl in spontaneously breathing dogs under halothane-nitrous oxide anaesthesia.