Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in cats: a review

Authors

  • B Duncan X Lascelles BVSc, PhD, Diplomate ACVS and ECVS,

    1. Comparative Pain Research Laboratory, Department of Clinical Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA
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  • Michael H Court BVSc, PhD, Diplomate ACVA,

    1. Comparative and Molecular Pharmacogenetics Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
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  • Elizabeth M Hardie DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Comparative Pain Research Laboratory, Department of Clinical Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA
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  • Sheilah A Robertson BVMS, PhD, Diplomate ACVA and ECVA

    1. Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
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BDX Lascelles, Comparative Pain Research Laboratory, Department of Clinical Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606, USA. E-mail: duncan_lascelles@ncsu.edu

Abstract

Objective  To review the evidence regarding the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in cats

Databases used  PubMed, CAB abstracts.

Conclusions  Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should be used with caution in cats because of their low capacity for hepatic glucuronidation, which is the major mechanism of metabolism and excretion for this category of drugs. However, the evidence presented supports the short-term use of carprofen, flunixin, ketoprofen, meloxicam and tolfenamic acid as analgesics in cats. There were no data to support the safe chronic use of NSAIDs in cats.

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