The relation of trait self-esteem and positive inequity to productivity

Authors


  • The author thanks Max Bazerman and Stephen G West for their insightful comments on an earlier version of the manuscript In addition, I am indebted to the following students for their competence in collecting the data Paul Gant, Marta Lawson, Carol Pastan, Steve Sands, and Howard Schomer I also express appreciation to the University of Arizona for its research support

Requests for reprints and all correspondence should be sent to the author at the following address Graduate School of Business, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027

Abstract

The present study explored the relation of trait self-esteem and positive inequity to productivity Subjects worked on proofreading task, and received hourly (rather than piece-rate) compensation that was either greater than (positive inequity condition) or equal to (equity condition) the amount that they deserved The results showed that individuals of high and medium self-esteem were more productive (i e, completed more of the task) in the positive inequity condition than in the equity condition Low self-esteem participants however, were actually less productive (i e, completed less of the task) in the positive inequity than in the equity condition Theoretical implications are discussed

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