Measuring Daily Events and Experiences: Decisions for the Researcher

Authors

  • Arthur A. Stone,

    Corresponding author
    1. SUNY–Stony Brook
      Requests for reprints may be addressed to Arthur A. Stone, Department of Psychiatry, SUNY-Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8790, or to Ronald C. Kessler, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1248.
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  • Ronald C. Kessler,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Michigan
      Requests for reprints may be addressed to Arthur A. Stone, Department of Psychiatry, SUNY-Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8790, or to Ronald C. Kessler, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1248.
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  • Jennifer A. Haythomthwatte

    1. National Institute on Aging
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  • The authors appreciate the support of the following grants in the preparation of this manuscript: Grant R01-MH39234 awarded to Arthur A. Stone; and MERIT Award M01-MH42714, Research Scientist Development Award K01-MH00507, and Grant R01-MH41135 awarded to Ronald C. Kessler. All grants are from the National Institute of Mental Health.

Requests for reprints may be addressed to Arthur A. Stone, Department of Psychiatry, SUNY-Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8790, or to Ronald C. Kessler, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1248.

Abstract

ABSTRACT There has been a burgeoning interest in studying daily events and experiences. This article discusses a variety of methodologic challenges that face daily event and experience researchers. The issues discussed include techniques for measuring events, the development of event checklists, sampling event content, specifying event appraisals, event validation procedures, and the creation of summary measures derived from event checklists. Procedural issues discussed include determining the number of observations and persons needed for daily event studies, the evaluation of response, attrition, and missing item bias, and problems linking event reports over time.

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