Self-Concept Clarity and Preferred Coping Styles

Authors


  • This research was supported by USDA Hatch 321-7419, awarded to the second author. An earlier version of this article was presented at the 1992 annual meeting of the American Psychological Association in Washington, DC. The authors wish to thank David A. Dunning, John Eckenrode, and the anonymous reviewers for their contributions to this report, as well as Nicholas Huntington, Ester Semsei, J'Ingrid Clemons, and Jon Paul Varela for their help in collecting and coding the data.

Requests for reprints should be sent to Maureen Smith, Box 74 Peabody, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37203.

Abstract

ABSTRACT This study examined the relation between self-concept clarity and (a) preferred general coping styles, (b) coping with a specific event, and (c) coping with a specific ongoing situation in 175 undergraduate students. The results of the regression analyses for general coping styles indicated that self-concept clarity made a reliable but weak positive contribution to active coping styles (e.g., planning and taking action) and a strong negative contribution to passive coping styles (e.g., denial). The unique negative contribution of self-concept clarity to passive coping was replicated with respect to coping with a specific event and to coping with a specific ongoing situation. However, the weaker positive contribution of self-concept clarity to active coping was not replicated with respect to coping with specific events or specific ongoing situations.

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