Honesty-Humility, the Big Five, and the Five-Factor Model

Authors


  • Michael C. Ashton, Department of Psychology, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada; Kibeom Lee, Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

  • This research was supported by Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Grants 410-2003-0946 and 410-2003-1835 and by Grant MH-49227 from the National Institute of Mental Health, U.S. Public Health Service.

  • We thank Lewis R. Goldberg for providing the data from the Eugene-Springfield Community Sample and for giving helpful comments on an earlier version of this article.

concerning this article should be addressed to Michael C. Ashton, Department of Psychology, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON L2S 3A1 Canada (E-mail: mashton@brocku.ca) or to Kibeom Lee, Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4 Canada (E-mail: kibeom@ucalgary.ca).

Abstract

Abstract This study investigated the relations of the proposed sixth factor of personality, Honesty-Humility, with the dimensions of the classic English lexical Big Five and the closely related Five-Factor Model (FFM). Results showed that although Honesty-Humility was largely unrelated to markers of the Big Five factors, it was substantially correlated with the FFM Agreeableness domain. This relation was largely due to the Straightforwardness and Modesty facets of FFM Agreeableness, which were only weakly correlated with the Big Five version of Agreeableness. A realignment of FFM facets to produce separate Honesty-Humility and Agreeableness factors provided better prediction of personality variables that involve deceit without hostility, such as Social Adroitness and Self-Monitoring. Results indicate the importance of assessing Honesty-Humility as a separate factor.

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