Get access

Now I see it but you don't: 14-month-olds can represent another person's visual perspective

Authors


Address for correspondence: Beate Sodian, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Fakultät 11, Entwicklungspsychologie und Pädagogische Psychologie, Leopoldstr. 13, 80802, München, Germany; e-mail: sodian@edupsy.uni-muenchen.de

Abstract

Twelve- and 14-month-old infants’ ability to represent another person's visual perspective (Level-1 visual perspective taking) was studied in a looking-time paradigm. Fourteen-month-olds looked longer at a person reaching for and grasping a new object when the old goal-object was visible than when it was invisible to the person (but visible to the infant). These findings are consistent with the interpretation that infants ‘rationalized’ the person's reach for a new object when the old goal-object was out of sight. Twelve-month-olds did not distinguish between test conditions. The present findings are consistent with recent research on infants’ developing understanding of seeing.

Ancillary