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Children's working understanding of the knowledge gained from seeing and feeling

Authors


Address for correspondence: E.J. Robinson, Department of Psychology, Warwick University, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK; e-mail: e.j.robinson@warwick.ac.uk

Abstract

In three experiments (N = 48 3- to 4-year olds; 100 3- to 5-year olds; 54 4-year-olds), children who could see or feel a target toy, recognized when they had sufficient information to answer ‘Which one is it?’ and when they needed additional access. They were weaker at taking the informative modality of access when the choice was between seeing more of a partially visible toy and feeling it; at doing so when the target was completely hidden; and at reporting seeing or feeling as their source of knowledge of the target's identity having experienced both. Working understanding of the knowledge gained from seeing and feeling (identifying the target efficiently) was not necessarily in advance of explicit understanding (reporting the informative source).

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