Impact of drought-related vaccination on livestock mortality in pastoralist areas of Ethiopia

Authors


Correspondence
Andy Catley, Feinstein International Center, PO Box 1078, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Telephone: +251 911 366189; e-mail: andrew.catley@tufts.edu.

Abstract

Under a national Livestock Policy Forum in Ethiopia the impact of livestock vaccination during drought was assessed in order to inform the development of a best-practice guideline. For each of the different types of vaccine used during drought years there was no significant difference in livestock mortality, for any species, in vaccinated compared with non-vaccinated herds. The limited impact of vaccination on livestock mortality was attributed to weaknesses in the design and implementation of vaccination programmes, including use of inappropriate vaccines, low vaccination coverage, problems with vaccine dosing, incorrect timing of vaccination and problems with vaccine storage. If these weaknesses could be overcome vaccination could be a useful means to protect livestock assets, with considerable benefit-cost ratios. Vaccination should be conducted as a standard preventive measure during normal years, and programme design should be informed by participatory epidemiological studies.

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