HECKSHER-OHLIN IN CANADA: NEW ESTIMATES OF REGIONAL WAGES AND LAND PRICES

Authors

  • J. C. Herbert Emery,

    1. University of Calgary,
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  • Kris Inwood,

    1. University of Guelph, and
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  • Henry Thille

    1. University of Guelph
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    • *

      For their comments and suggestions we thank Gerald Friesen, Hugh Grant, David Greasley, Mary MacKinnon, Doug McCalla, Barry Prentice, John Singleton, Ken Sylvester, and participants at the February 2006 meeting of the Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand and the August 2006 Congress of the International Economic History Association (session 82). The maps Figure 1 and Figure 3 were drawn by M. Puddister, University of Guelph. We are especially grateful for the support of the Centre of Canadian Studies at the University of Edinburgh, where the paper was drafted.


Abstract

Many immigrant-receiving and land-abundant countries experienced a diminishing ratio of wages to land prices during the globalisation era from 1870 to 1910. Factor price evidence suggests that Canada does not fit the pattern. We present the first Canadian estimates of region-specific wages and land prices that span the period from 1871 to 1925. Our evidence indicates that while Canada as a nation looks like an anomaly in the era of convergence, this is largely an artefact of aggregating the experience of the labour-abundant eastern provinces with the late-settling and land-abundant western provinces.

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