The Effects of Individual and School Factors on University Students' Academic Performance

Authors

  • Rosemary Win,

    1. Business School The University of Western Australia
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  • Paul W. Miller

    1. Business School The University of Western Australia
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      We are grateful to Greg Marie (Institutional Research Unit, University of Western Australia) and Ross Kelly (Centre for Labour Market Research) for provision of data, and to Ken Clements, Anh Le, Greg Marie, David Treloar, two anonymous referees and an editor for helpful comments. Miller acknowledges financial assistance from the Australian Research Council and the Department of Education, Science and Training. Opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors, and should not be attributed to the funding agencies or to the University of Western Australia.


Abstract

This article examines the factors that influence university students'academic performance, focusing on the role of student background and school factors. Using data on the first-year students at the University of Western Australia in 2001, two methodologies are employed. The first is analogous to an input-output approach, and the second is a random coefficients model. A key finding is that high schools have an impact on the academic performance of students at university beyond students' own background characteristics. Both immersion and reinforcement effects are identified.

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