Effects of Tightening Smoking Regulations on Take-up and Cessation of Smoking

Authors

  • Hielke Buddelmeyer,

    1. Buddelmeyer: Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne and Institute for the Study of Labor, Bonn; Wilkins: Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Roger Wilkins

    1. Buddelmeyer: Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne and Institute for the Study of Labor, Bonn; Wilkins: Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    Search for more papers by this author
    • This article uses unit record data from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey. The HILDA Project was initiated and is funded by the Australian government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) and is managed by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research. The findings and views reported in this article, however, are those of the authors and should not be attributed to either FaHCSIA or the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research. We are grateful to David Black for providing valuable research assistance and to two anonymous referees for helpful comments and suggestions.


Abstract

We use a nationally representative Australian panel survey that allows us to track individuals’ smoking behaviour from 2001 to 2003, a period during which new tobacco regulations came into effect in four of the eight state and territory jurisdictions. We exploit this variation in regulations over time and across jurisdictions to produce estimates of the effects of tighter smoking regulations on smoking behaviour within the year the regulations were introduced. Although increased (non-pecuniary) costs of smoking will almost certainly have some negative effects on smoking, our analysis suggests that effects on smoking rates in the short term are negligible.

Ancillary