SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • Aaltio, I. and A. J.Mills (eds) (2002). Gender, Identity and the Culture of Organizations. London: Routledge.
  • Acker, J. (1992). ‘Gendering organizational theory’. In A. J.Mills and P.Tancred (eds), Gendering Organizational Analysis, pp. 248260. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.
  • Adler, N. and D.Izraeli (eds) (1988). Women in Management Worldwide. New York: M. E. Sharpe.
  • Adler, N. and D.Izraeli (eds) (1994). Competitive Frontiers: Women Managers in a Global Economy. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell.
  • Alimo-Metcalfe, B. (1993). ‘Women in management: organizational socialization and assessment practices that prevent career advancement’, International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 1, pp. 6882.
  • Alvesson, M. and Y. Due Billing (1997). Understanding Gender and Organizations. London: Sage.
  • Aupperle, K. (2001). ‘Mary Parker Follett and the metaphors of Gareth Morgan’. Symposium presentation, University of Akron, August.
  • Aupperle, K. (ed.) (2007). Special Issue on Mary Parker Follett, International Journal of Public Administration, 30 (4).
  • Bilimoria, D. and S. K.Piderit (eds) (2007). Handbook on Women in Business and Management. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.
  • Bondi, L. (1998). ‘Sexing the city’. In R.Fincher and J. M.Jacobs (eds), Cities of Difference, pp. 177200. New York: Guilford Press.
  • Brush, C. G., N. M.Carter, E. J.Gatewood and M. M.Hart (eds) (2006). Women and Entrepreneurship: Contemporary Classics. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.
  • Burke, R. (2002). ‘Career development of managerial women’. In R. J.Burke and D. L.Nelson (eds), Advancing Women's Careers. Oxford: Blackwell.
  • Butler, J. (1990). Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. New York and London: Routledge.
  • Byrne, D. and J. H. Neuman (1992). ‘The implications of attraction research for organizational issues’. In K.Kelley (ed.), Issues, Theory, and Research in Industrial/Organizational Psychology. Amsterdam: Elsevier.
  • Calás, M. B. and L. Smircich (1996). ‘From “the woman's” point of view: feminist approaches to organization studies’. In S. R.Clegg, C.Hardy and W. R.Nord (eds), Handbook of Organization Studies, pp. 218257. London: Sage.
  • Calás, M. B. and L. Smircich (2006). ‘From “the woman's” point of view ten years later: towards a feminist organization studies’. In S. R.Clegg, C.Hardy, T. B.Lawrence and W. R.Nord (eds), Handbook of Organization Studies, 2nd edn, pp. 284346. London: Sage.
  • Carrigan, T., R. W. Connell and J. Lee (1985). ‘Towards a new sociology of masculinity’, Theory and Society, 14, pp. 551604.
  • Chênevert, D. and M. Tremblay (2002). ‘Managerial career success in Canadian organizations: is gender a determinant?’, International Journal of Human Resource Management, 13 (6), pp. 920941.
  • Cockburn, C. K. (1991). In the Way of Women: Men's Resistance to Sex Equality in Organizations. Basingstoke: Macmillan.
  • Collinson, D. L. and J. Hearn (1994). ‘Naming men as men: implications for work, organizations and management’, Gender, Work and Organization, 1 (1), pp. 222.
  • Collinson, D. L. and J. Hearn (1995). ‘Men managing leadership? “Men and Women of the Corporation” revisited’, International Review of Women and Leadership, 1 (2), pp. 124.
  • Collinson, D. L. and J.Hearn (eds) (1996). Men as Managers, Managers as Men: Critical Perspectives on Men, Masculinities and Managements. London: Sage.
  • Connell, R. W. (1985). ‘Theorising gender’, Sociology, 19, pp. 260272.
  • Connell, R. W. (1987). Gender and Power. Cambridge: Polity.
  • Davidson, M. J. and R. J.Burke (eds) (1994). Women in Management: Current Research Issues. London: Paul Chapman.
  • Davidson, M. J. and R. J.Burke (eds) (2000). Women in Management: Current Research Issues II. London: Sage.
  • Davidson, M. J. and C. L. Cooper (1984). ‘Occupational stress in female managers: a comparative approach’, Journal of Management Studies, 21, pp. 185205.
  • Due Billing, Y. (1994). ‘Gender and bureaucracies: a critique of Ferguson's “The feminist case against bureaucracy”’, Gender, Work and Organization, 1 (4), pp. 179193.
  • Due Billing, Y. and M. Alvesson (1994). Gender, Management and Organizations. Berlin: de Gruyter.
  • Dunn-Jensen, L. M. and L. K. Stroh (2007). ‘Myths in media: how the news media portray women in the workforce’. In D.Bilimoria and S. K.Piderit (eds), Handbook on Women in Business and Management. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.
  • Durkin, J. J. (1978). ‘The potential of women’. In B. A.Stead (ed.), Women in Management, pp. 4246. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
  • Economist, The (2005). ‘Special report: Women in business, the conundrum of the glass ceiling’, The Economist, 23 July, pp. 6769.
  • Edwards, A. (1989). ‘The sex–gender distinction: has it outlived its usefulness?’, Australian Feminist Studies, 10, pp. 112.
  • Eichler, M. (1980). The Double Standard: A Feminist Critique of Feminist Social Science. London: Croom Helm.
  • Ely, R. J., M.Scully and E.Foldy (eds) (2003). Reader in Gender, Work and Organization. Oxford and New York: Blackwell.
  • Employment, Social Affairs and Equal Opportunities (2006). Women and Men in Decision Making. A Question of Balance. Brussels: EUROPA.
  • Equal Opportunities Commission (2006). Sex and Power: Who Runs Britain? Manchester: Equal Opportunities Commission.
  • Equal Opportunities Commission (2007). The Gender Agenda. Manchester: Equal Opportunities Commission.
  • European Commission (2006). Report on Equality Between Women and Men. Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities.
  • Eurostat (2006). ‘A statistical view of the life of women and men in the EU25’, News Release 29/2006, 6 March.
  • Ferguson, K. (1984). The Feminist Case Against Bureaucracy. Philadephia, PA: Temple University Press.
  • Fielden, S. L. and C. L. Cooper (2002). ‘Managerial stress: are women more at risk?’ In R. J.Burke and D.Nelson (eds), Gender, Work and Stress. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
  • Fielden, S. L. and M. J.Davidson (eds) (2005). International Handbook of Women and Small Business Entrepreneurship. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.
  • Follett, M. P. (1918). The New State – Group Organization, the Solution for Popular Government. New York: Longman, Green and Co. Available at http://sunsite.utk.edu/FINS/Mary_Parker_Follett/Fins-MPF-01.html
  • Gatrell, C. and C. L. Cooper (2007). ‘(No) cracks in the glass ceiling: women managers, stress and the barriers to success’. In D.Bilimoria and S. K.Piderit (eds), Handbook on Women in Business and Management. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.
  • Gordon, J. R. and K. S. Whelan-Barry (2004). ‘It takes two to tango: an empirical study of perceived spousal/partner support for working women’, Women in Management Review, 19 (5), pp. 260273.
  • Grimshaw, D. and J. Rubery (2007). ‘Undervaluing women's work’. Working Paper 53. Manchester: Equal Opportunities Commission.
  • Halford, S. and P. Leonard (2001). Gender, Organisations and Power. London: Palgrave.
  • Hearn, J. (1987). The Gender of Oppression: Men, Masculinity and the Critique of Marxism. Brighton: Wheatsheaf; New York: St Martin's.
  • Hearn, J. (1992). Men in the Public Eye: The Construction and Deconstruction of Public Men and Public Patriarchies. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Hearn, J. and W. Parkin (1983). ‘Gender and organizations: a selective review and a critique of a neglected area’, Organization Studies, 4 (3), pp. 219242.
  • Hearn, J. and W. Parkin (1987). ‘Sex’ at ‘Work’: The Power and Paradox of Organisation Sexuality. Brighton: Wheatsheaf; New York: St Martin's.
  • Hearn, J. and W. Parkin (1995). ‘Sex’ at ‘Work’: The Power and Paradox of Organisation Sexuality, revised and updated. Hemel Hempstead: Prentice Hall/Harvester Wheatsheaf.
  • Hearn, J. and W. Parkin (2001). Gender, Sexuality and Violence in Organizations: The Unspoken Forces of Organization Violations. London: Sage.
  • Hearn, J., B. Metcalfe and R. Piekkari (2006). ‘Gender in international human resource management’. In I.Björkman and G.Stahl (eds), Handbook of Research on International Human Resource Management, pp. 502522. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.
  • Heilman, M. E. (2001). ‘Description and prescription: how gender stereotypes prevent women's ascent up the organizational ladder’, Journal of Social Issues, 67 (4), pp. 657674.
  • Hopkins, J. (2000). ‘Signs of masculinism in an “uneasy” place: advertising for “Big Brothers”’, Gender, Place and Culture, 7 (1), pp. 3555.
  • Hunt, C., M. J. Davidson, S. R. Fielden and H. Hoel (2007). ‘Sexual harassment in the workplace: a literature review'. Working Paper 59. Manchester: Equal Opportunities Commission.
  • Ibarra, H. (1992). ‘Homophily and differential returns: sex differences in network structure and access in an advertising firm’, Administrative Science Quarterly, 37, pp. 422447.
  • Institute of Management (1995). National Management Salary Survey. Kingston-on-Thames: Institute of Management.
  • Institute of Management/Remuneration Economics (1998). UK National Management Survey. London: Institute of Management.
  • Itzin, C. and J.Newman (eds) (1995). Gender, Culture and Organizational Change. London: Routledge.
  • Jacklin, C. N. and E. E. Maccoby (1975). ‘Sex differences and their implications for management’. In E.Gordon and M. H.Strober (eds), Bringing Women into Management, pp. 2338. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  • Jones, O. (2000). ‘Scientific management, culture and control: a first-hand account of Taylorism in practice’, Human Relations, 53, pp. 631653.
  • Kanter, R. M. (1977). Men and Women of the Corporation. New York: Basic Books. Republished 1993.
  • Kerfoot, D. and D. Knights (1993). ‘Management masculinity and manipulation: from paternalism to corporate strategy in financial services in Britain’, Journal of Management Studies, 30, pp. 659679.
  • Kimmel, M. (2004). The Gendered Society, 2nd edn. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Kondo, D. (1990). Crafting Selves: Power, Gender, and Discourses of Identity in a Japanese Workplace. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.
  • Konrad, A., P.Prasad and J.Pringle (eds) (2006). Handbook of Workplace Diversity. London: Sage.
  • Las Heras, M. and D. T. Hall (2007). ‘Integration of career and life’. In D.Bilimoria and S. K.Piderit (eds), Handbook on Women in Business and Management. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.
  • Legge, K. (1987). ‘Women in personnel management: uphill climb or downhill slide?’ In A.Spencer and D.Podmore (eds), In a Man's World. London: Tavistock.
  • Liff, S. (1999). ‘Diversity and equal opportunities: room for a constructive compromise?’, Human Resource Management Journal, 9, pp. 6575.
  • Liff, S. and I. Cameron (1997). ‘Changing equality cultures to move beyond “women's” problems’, Gender, Work and Organization, 4 (1), pp. 3546.
  • Liff, S. and J. Wajcman (1996). ‘Sameness and difference revisited: which way forward for equal opportunity initiatives’, Journal of Management Studies, 31, pp. 7994.
  • Linehan, M. (2002). ‘Senior female international managers: empirical evidence from Western Europe’, International Journal of Human Resource Management, 13 (5), pp. 802814.
  • MacEwenScott A. (ed.) (1994). Gender Segregation and Social Change: Men and Women in Changing Labour Markets. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Marshall, J. (1984). Women Travellers in a Male World. London: Wiley.
  • Marshall, J. (1991). ‘Women managers’. In A.Mumford (ed.), Handbook of Management Development, 3rd edn, pp. 358373. Aldershot: Gower.
  • Meyerson, D. and J. Fletcher (2000). ‘A modest manifesto for shattering the glass ceiling’, Harvard Business Review, 78 (1), pp. 127140.
  • Mills, A. and P.Tancred (eds) (1992). Gendering Organizational Analysis. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.
  • Morgan, G. (1986). Images of Organization. London: Sage.
  • National Statistics (2006). 2006 Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings. London: National Statistics.
  • Oakley, A. (1972). Sex, Gender and Society. London: Temple Smith. Revised edn 1985, Aldershot: Gower.
  • OECD Employment Outlook (2002). OECD. Available at http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/36/7/17652667.pdf
  • Oerton, S. (1996). Beyond Hierarchy: Gender, Sexuality and the Social Economy. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Parker, M. (2002). ‘Queering management and organization’, Gender, Work and Organization, 9 (2), pp. 146166.
  • Pelled, L. H., G. E. Ledford and S. A. Mohrman (1999). ‘Demographic dissimilarity and workplace inclusion’, Journal of Management Studies, 36 (7), pp. 10131031.
  • Piderit, S. K. (2007). ‘Balance, integration and harmonization: selected metaphors for managing the parts and the whole of living’. In D.Bilimoria and S. K.Piderit (eds), Handbook on Women in Business and Management. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.
  • Powell, G. N. (1993). Women and Men in Management. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  • Powell, G. N. and L. M. Graves (2003). Women and Men in Management, 3rd edn. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  • Powell, G. N., D. A. Butterfield and J. Parent (2002). ‘Gender and managerial stereotypes: have the times changed?’, Journal of Management, 28 (2), pp. 177193.
  • Rantalaiho, L. and T.Heiskanen (eds) (1997). Gendered Practices in Working Life. London: Macmillan.
  • Reskin, B. and I. Padavic (1994). Women and Men at Work. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press.
  • Richardson, D. (2007). ‘Patterned fluidities: (re)imagining the relationship between gender and sexuality’, Sociology, 41 (3), pp. 457474.
  • Richardson, D., J.McLaughlin and M.Casey (eds) (2006). Intersections Between Feminist and Queer Theory. Basingstoke: Palgrave.
  • Roper, M. R. (1994). Masculinity and the British Organization Man since 1945. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Rowbotham, S. (1979). ‘The trouble with “patriarchy”’, New Statesman, 98, p. 970.
  • Savage, M. and A.Witz (eds) (1992). Gender and Bureaucracy. Oxford: Blackwell.
  • Schein, V. (2001). ‘A global look at psychological barriers to women's progress in management’, Journal of Social Issues, 57 (4), pp. 675688.
  • Schneider, B. (1987). ‘The people make the place’, Personnel Psychology, 40, pp. 437453.
  • Sealy, R., V. Singh and S. Vinnicombe (2007). The Female FTSE Report 2007. Cranfield: Cranfield School of Management.
  • Sedgwick, E. K. (1991). The Epistemology of the Closet. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.
  • Singh, V. and S. Vinnicombe (2004). The Female FTSE Report 2004. Cranfield: Cranfield School of Management.
  • Singh, V. and S. Vinnicombe (2005). The Female FTSE Index 2005. Cranfield: Cranfield School of Management.
  • Singh, V. and S. Vinnicombe (2006). The Female FTSE Report 2006. Cranfield: Cranfield School of Management.
  • Skidmore, P. (2004). ‘A legal perspective on sexuality and organization: a lesbian and gay case study’, Gender, Work and Organization, 11 (3), pp. 229253.
  • Stoller, R. (1968). Sex and Gender. New York: Science House.
  • Thomas, R., A. J.Mills and J.Helm Mills (eds) (2004). Identity Politics at Work: Resisting Gender, Gendering Resistance. London: Routledge.
  • Trudinger, D. (2004) ‘The comfort of men: a critical history of managerial and professional men in post-war modernisation, Australia 1945–1965’, PhD Thesis, Department of History, University of Sydney.
  • Veikkola, E.-S., E. Hänninen-Salmelin and S. Sinkkonen (1997). ‘Is the forecast for wind or calm?’ In E.-S.Veikkola (ed.), Women and Men at the Top: A Study of Women and Men at the Top, pp. 8287. Gender Statistics 1997:1. Helsinki: Statistics Finland.
  • Vinnicombe, S. (2000). ‘The position of women in Europe’. In M. J.Davidson and R. J.Burke (eds), Women in Management: Current Research Issues II, pp. 925. London: Sage.
  • Walby, S. (1986). Patriarchy at Work. Cambridge: Polity.
  • Walby, S. (1990). Theorising Patriarchy. Cambridge: Polity.
  • Wilson, E. (ed.) (2000). Organizational Behaviour Reassessed: The Impact of Gender. London: Sage.
  • Wilson, F. (1995). Organizational Behaviour and Gender. London: McGraw-Hill.
  • Wilson, F. (2003). Organizational Behaviour and Gender. Aldershot: Ashgate.