Feeling Included and Valued: How Perceived Respect Affects Positive Team Identity and Willingness to Invest in the Team

Authors

  • Naomi Ellemers,

    1. Department of Psychology, University of Leiden, The Netherlands
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    • These authors contributed equally to the present research.
  • Ed Sleebos,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Organization Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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    • These authors contributed equally to the present research.
  • Daan Stam,

    1. Department of Management of Technology and Innovation, Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands
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    • These authors contributed equally to the present research.
  • Dick de Gilder

    1. Department of Organization Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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  • The Behavioural Sciences Services Centre of the Royal Netherlands Armed Forces facilitated preparation of this work. The authors thank Dr Renier van Gelooven, LtCol. MSc Bert Hendriks, LtCol. MSc Frits Jansen and LtCol. MSc Peter van Kuijk. The views, opinions and/or findings contained herein are those of the authors and should not be construed as an official Royal Netherlands Armed Forces position, policy or decision. In addition, the authors thank Peter Bentler and Sim Sitkin for their comments on an earlier version of this paper.

Corresponding author email: E.P.Sleebos@vu.nl

Abstract

Previous research has documented that intra-group respect fosters individual engagement with work teams or organizations. The authors extend this work by empirically distinguishing between perceived inclusion of the self in the team and perceived value of the self for the team as separate psychological consequences of respect. Based on a social identity analysis, it is predicted that perceived inclusion facilitates the development of a positive team identity (how the individual feels about the team), while perceived value elicits the willingness to invest in the team (what the individual is willing to do for the team). Support for these predictions is obtained with structural equation modelling among two independent samples of professional soldiers working in military teams (ntotal = 495). Reports of individual team members about positive team identity and willingness to invest in the team correlated with supervisor ratings of the team's action readiness.

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