Errata

Errata

This article corrects:

  1. Jimmy’s Baby Doll and Jenny’s Truck: Young Children’s Reasoning About Gender Norms Volume 83, Issue 1, 146–158, Article first published online: 16 December 2011

Conry-Murray, C., & Turiel, E. (2012). Jimmy’s baby doll and Jenny’s truck: Young children’s reasoning about gender norms. Child Development, 83, 146–158.

Standard deviations were incorrectly reported in several places. On page 151, the SDs for knowledge for gender norms for toys, costumes, and classes should be .15, .18, and .18 for males, and .21, .26, and .30 for females, respectively. On page 152, the SD for judgments of who the parents should choose for classes is .29. It is .31 for toys and .27 for costumes. Also on page 152, the SD for gender norm justifications is .39 for classes and .34 for costumes. On p. 153, the SD for females’ judgments of a reversals of a male norm in another country is .24 and females’ judgments of a male norm’s SD is .34. On page 154, the SD for judgments about enforcing norms regarding a toy is .35, and for classes, it is .39. Finally on page p. 154, the SDs for 4 year olds’ judgments of enforcing a rule in another country are .29 for girls and .27 for boys. Table 1 is corrected below.

Table 1. 
Mean judgments (percentages) and SDs by age
Story468
MSDMSDMSD
  1. Note. All means are proportions except Parental choice should be norm-consistent where 1 = choice was based on a stereotypical choice, 2 = a refusal to choose or both and 3 = counter-stereotypical choice. Means in the same row with different subscripts differ at < .05.

Parental choice should be norm-consistent
 Class.69 (70).25.74 (72).26.65 (63).35
 Toy.87 (87).27.87 (85).28.76 (73).36
 Costume.89 (88).22.93 (92).19.81 (80).36
 Total.81 (82).17.85 (83).12.74 (72).27
Norm can be reversed in another country
 Class.60 (61).40.86 (85).28.90 (92).25
 Toy.58 (60).41.86 (83).33.91 (92).19
 Costume.65 (65).42.76 (77).29.98 (98).10
 Total.61a (62).36.82b (82).23.93b (94).14
Choose counter-stereotypical child who wants it more
 Class.78 (75).39.92 (92).14.98 (98).10
 Toy.73 (71).34.93 (94).22.95 (96).15
 Costume.68 (63).44.92 (92).19.92 (91).20
 Total.73a (70).35.92b (92).14.95b (95).12
Rule enforcing norm is not OK
 Class.44 (44).41.75 (75).36.98 (98).10
 Toy.63 (60).44.83 (83).321.00 (100).00
 Costume.60 (55).39.75 (75).42.93 (94).18
 Total.55a (53).36.78b (78).33.97b (97).07
Rule enforcing norm is not OK in another country
 Class.53 (44).44.77 (75).40.95 (96).21
 Toy.53 (42).40.74 (72).40.97 (96).14
 Costume.52 (51).41.73 (74).39.94 (96).22
 Total.53a (43).36.74b (74).32.96c (96).13

Latendresse, S. J., Bates, J. E., Goodnight, J. A., Lansford, J. E., Budde, J. P., Goate, A., Dodge, K. A., Pettit, G. S., & Dick, D. M. (2011). Differential susceptibility to adolescent externalizing trajectories: Examining the interplay between CHRM2 and peer group antisocial behavior. Child Development, 82, 1797–1814.

All references to “minor (least frequently observed) allele” and “minor allelic variant” should read “major (most frequently observed) allele” and “major allelic variant,” respectively.

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