Get access

Spanking and Child Development During the First 5 Years of Life

Authors


  • The Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study is funded by NICHD Grants R01HD36916, R01HD39135, and R01HD40421, as well as a consortium of private foundations and other government agencies. This research was supported by NICHD Grant K01HD054421 (to Berger). We are grateful to David Kaplan, Dan Meyer, Sarah Bruch, Mike Brondino, and Sarah Beal for their excellent advice and assistance.

concerning this article should be addressed to Kathryn Maguire-Jack, School of Social Work, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1350 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706. Electronic mail may be sent to kmaguire@wisc.edu.

Abstract

Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 3,870) and cross-lagged path analysis, the authors examined whether spanking at ages 1 and 3 is adversely associated with cognitive skills and behavior problems at ages 3 and 5. The authors found spanking at age 1 was associated with a higher level of spanking and externalizing behavior at age 3, and spanking at age 3 was associated with a higher level of internalizing and externalizing behavior at age 5. The associations between spanking at age 1 and behavioral problems at age 5 operated predominantly through ongoing spanking at age 3. The authors did not find an association between spanking at age 1 and cognitive skills at age 3 or 5.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary